125th Ohio flag (flown at Franklin) sold at auction

Source: Cowan’s Auction

Lot of 2, featuring 12 x 9 in. section of cotton, machine-stitched regimental flag identified in ink to the 125th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and inscribed with the names of the battles in which the flag had been used by the regiment. The flag is inscribed as follows (original spelling retained): 125th OVI / Chickamauga – Mishionary Ridge – Dandridge – Rockey Fase Ridge – Resackey – Mudy Crick – New Hope – Kenasaw Mountain – Peachtree Crick – Front of Atlanta – Jonesburow – Lovejoy Station – Franklin – Nashville / 1862-1865.

Accompanied by letter, 1.5pp, from Private Edwin C. Woodworth, written from Camp of the 125th Ohio, Huntsville, AL, dated July 14, 1865, in which he refers to the piece of the regimental flag upon which he wrote the names of the battles, noting that 187 men felled under the flag. He also advises his mother not to wash the flag or the ink will come off. With original envelope.

Edwin Woodworth enlisted as a private in September 1862 and mustered into Co. B of the 125th Ohio Infantry in November 1862. Under the command of Colonel Emerson Opdycke, the 125th OH was initially involved in long marches and skirmishes until taking part in the Battle of Chickamauga. The regiment, which gained a high reputation for its fighting qualities, then participated in the Battle of Missionary Ridge and joined William Tecumseh Sherman in his Atlanta Campaign. It fought all the way until the end, at the Battle of Jonesborough, and then preceded to follow Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood North to Nashville, TN. Private Woodworth remained with the 125th OH through June 20, 1865 when he mustered out of service.

Great description by 100th Illinois solider (Lane’s Brigade) at Franklin, and artifacts

Pvt. – Sgt. Andrew W. Johnson
100 Illinois Infantry co. D. His Residence Plain field Illinois Enlisted 8/1/1862 as a Private. Promotions Sergt. He mustered out on 6/12/1865
Here`s some great information about Sgt. Johnson at the battle of Franklin Tennessee,
“We arrived at Franklin about noon, the enemy closely following us. Schofields corps were then behind a good line of works, our division was placed in line in front of them, and some slight works thrown up hurriedly. We could see Hood`s army marching over the hills, south of us. and watch them form their lines. Then commenced the battle, the enemy charging us in great force about four o`clock. We were compelled to leave the first line, falling back to the second line of works. and there the battle raged till almost nine p.m. The enemy charged the works five times, some of them being killed close on them. Gen. Clayborne and his horse fell right on our works. The fighting was terrific. We were now behind the works, and the enemy in the open field, almost the first battle in which the 100th had this advantage. There was a small grove of young locust trees just in front of part of our line,  every tree of which was cut off by bullets. The enemy withdrew having been repulsed each time. Clayborne`s division was nearly annihilated. Our list of casualties was again a sad one, for we lost one of the most valued of our remaining officers. Maj. Rodney S. Bowen was wounded in the thigh, and was placed in the last ambulance that started for Nashville, and died at that place three days after.  Michael Murphy our brave color sergeant, Co. C. was shot down while planting the colors in the face of the foe. and when Murphy fell, Andrew W. Johnson of co. D. sprang forward and snatched the colors and saved them from capture, for which he was made color sergeant.”
Source for excerpt and image: