Category Archives: Images

CDV of Rose O’Neal Greenhow (1814-1864), a noted Confederate spy,

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Cowan’s is auctioning off this CDV (ends Sunday)

I’ve copied the exact catalog description as posted don the site.

Mathew Brady CDV titled, Mrs. Greenhow and Daughter, Imprisoned in the Old Captiol, Washington, D.C. and dated 1862. Mrs. Greenhow sits in a chair in a black laced mourning dress while her daughter moves in closer to her with her hand on her mother’s shoulder. 

Rose O’Neal Greenhow (1814-1864) was a noted Confederate spy, caught in the act of espionage and imprisoned in Washington, D.C. Greenhow was a Washington socialite who dined and conversed with presidents, generals, senators, and high-ranking military officers. She relayed important information to Confederate generals and controlled a pro-Southern spy network with her handler, Thomas Jordan. Jefferson Davis praised Greenhow’s pivotal intelligence work and credited the victory of the First Battle of Bull Run to her. She was caught and captured in August of 1861 and put under house arrest. When the government discovered she was still an active spy they imprisoned her and her daughter for five months. She was deported to the Confederate States where she traveled to Richmond, Virginia and received new diplomatic tasks. She sailed to France and Britain to represent the Confederacy and gain their favor. There, she wrote and published her memoir in London. Her returning ship to America ran aground in 1864 off Wilmington, North Carolina. She drowned when her rowboat overturned during her escape of a Union gunboat. The Confederacy honored her with a military funeral.

17th Mississippi Infantryman from Franklin was a veteran of many battles before he fought in his home town late in the war.

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William J. Bateman grew up in Franklin and married Sallie Nichols. They moved to Mississippi and he joined the 17th Mississippi Co I Inf.

Photo credit: Mary Nichols Britt collection in the Tennessee State Archives.

He mustered in 6/1/61. Depending on his verified war records he may have seen action at Bull Run I, Ball’s Bluff, Antietam, Perryville, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Vicksburg Chickamauga, Fort Sanders, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Franklin and Nashville.

2nd Michigan Cav played a key role at Franklin

Screen Shot 2014-10-23 at 10.25.16 PMAuction listing: 2nd Michigan Cavalry, no back mark, ink-signed “Shirk Miller/2nd Mich. Cavalry” on verso. Miller enlisted in Company F, 2nd Michigan Cavalry in September 1861 as a private and rose through the non-commissioned ranks to become a lieutenant in July 1865, finally mustering out in August. Lacking chevrons, this view probably taken shortly after joining as Miller still wears civilian corduroy pants or, alternatively, during veteran’s furlough in March 1864. The regiment served exclusively in the western theater from the siege of Corinth to Chickamauga, Atlanta and Franklin ending the war in Wilson’s Cavalry Corps having lost 74 men killed and wounded.

Source: Cowan’s auction, 2006

3rd Miss color bearer dies of wounds at Franklin

Sixth Plate Ambrotype of Confederate Color-Bearer Ensign John J. Cherry, 3rd Mis

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Auction partial listing: died of wounds received at Franklin. An early likeness of John Cherry at about 18 years of age likely taken at the time of his enlistment in Company C., 3rd Mississippi Infantry in September 1861, identified by old folded slip of paper in case having penciled “J.J. Cherry.” 

The 3rd Miss was part of Loring’s Division, Featherston’s Brigade. Jacobson says that Cherry was shot in the upper right arm and died of his wounds in January 1865.

Source: Cowan’s auction, 2006