Category Archives: Images

2nd Iowa Cav GAR badge

I visited a relic store in Decatur, GA recently and found this 2nd Iowa Cav GAR badge. It goes nicely with the tintype I recently sold of Milton Sweet, a 2nd Iowa Cav soldier. The 2nd Iowa Cav was part of the Battle of Franklin, especially Hood’s Retreat.


The badge (right) is for sale for $75.00. The image of Sweet (left) is sold.

12th TN Cav Lt Col involved in Hood’s Retreat

12th-tn-cavCharles C. Huefling was 29 years old when he enlisted. He was commissioned into Field & Staff at 1st Lt., on 1/11/1864 of the 12th Tennessee Cavalry (U.S.).  He saw promotions to Major on 3/24/1864 and Lt Col on August 16, 1864. He also saw service in Company M, 4th US Army Cavalry.

Huffing saw action at Franklin and participated in Hood’s Retreat.

Twelfth Cavalry. 

— Col.,George Spalding Lieut.-Cols. Charles C. Huefling, John S. Kirwan, Maj s., Sater Boland,  Jason A. Bradshaw. James W. Spalding.

This regiment was organized by companies, the first of which was mustered into service Aug. 24, 1863.  On Feb. 22, 1864, six companies had been mustered, and George Spalding was commissioned lieutenant-colonel.

The regiment was then assigned to Gen. Gillem’s division and was placed on guard duty on the Nashville & Northwestern railroad, where it remained until April, 1864.  During the remainder of the year the regiment was in active service almost continuously.

It was one of the most efficient regiments in opposing Wheeler on his raid through Middle Tennessee and had several severe engagements with portions of his command.  In the latter part of September it marched to contest the approach of Gen. Forrest, with whom it was several times engaged with considerable loss.

It was also active in the campaign against Hood, participating in the battles at Lawrenceburg, Campbellsville, Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville.  From Nashville the regiment was in the advance in pursuit of Hood and fired the last shot at the enemy as he crossed the Tennessee River at Bainbridge.

On Feb. 8, 1865, the regiment went into camp at Eastport, Miss., where it remained until May 11.  It was then transferred from the 2nd to the 1st brigade under the command of Bvt. Brig-Gen. George Spalding, who had been commissioned colonel upon the completion of the regiment Aug. 16, 1864, and ordered to St. Louis.

It was there remounted and refitted and sent to Fort Leavenworth, at which place, after having performed some escort and scout duty through northern Kansas and southern Nebraska, it was mustered out Oct. 7.

It returned to Nashville and was there finally paid and discharged Oct. 24, 1865.

CDV of Rose O’Neal Greenhow (1814-1864), a noted Confederate spy,

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Cowan’s is auctioning off this CDV (ends Sunday)

I’ve copied the exact catalog description as posted don the site.

Mathew Brady CDV titled, Mrs. Greenhow and Daughter, Imprisoned in the Old Captiol, Washington, D.C. and dated 1862. Mrs. Greenhow sits in a chair in a black laced mourning dress while her daughter moves in closer to her with her hand on her mother’s shoulder. 

Rose O’Neal Greenhow (1814-1864) was a noted Confederate spy, caught in the act of espionage and imprisoned in Washington, D.C. Greenhow was a Washington socialite who dined and conversed with presidents, generals, senators, and high-ranking military officers. She relayed important information to Confederate generals and controlled a pro-Southern spy network with her handler, Thomas Jordan. Jefferson Davis praised Greenhow’s pivotal intelligence work and credited the victory of the First Battle of Bull Run to her. She was caught and captured in August of 1861 and put under house arrest. When the government discovered she was still an active spy they imprisoned her and her daughter for five months. She was deported to the Confederate States where she traveled to Richmond, Virginia and received new diplomatic tasks. She sailed to France and Britain to represent the Confederacy and gain their favor. There, she wrote and published her memoir in London. Her returning ship to America ran aground in 1864 off Wilmington, North Carolina. She drowned when her rowboat overturned during her escape of a Union gunboat. The Confederacy honored her with a military funeral.

17th Mississippi Infantryman from Franklin was a veteran of many battles before he fought in his home town late in the war.

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William J. Bateman grew up in Franklin and married Sallie Nichols. They moved to Mississippi and he joined the 17th Mississippi Co I Inf.

Photo credit: Mary Nichols Britt collection in the Tennessee State Archives.

He mustered in 6/1/61. Depending on his verified war records he may have seen action at Bull Run I, Ball’s Bluff, Antietam, Perryville, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Vicksburg Chickamauga, Fort Sanders, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Franklin and Nashville.