36th Illinois soldier is killed on Carter House lawn, story comes full-circle more than 150 years later

One of our Facebook members – Kendyl Wallis – recently shared this story with us:

“The Colonel of my G-G grandfathers regiment, Colonel Porter Olson, 36th Illinois, was killed on the Carter House lawn. A shutter was torn from the house to use as a litter to carry him to the rear. About 10 years ago I was at Carnton, and I met a descendant of Fountain Branch Carter. We had a pleasant visit, and I pulled out my wallet and offered to reimburse her family for the shutter. We had a good laugh about that!”Lieutenant-Colonel Porter C. Olson, 36th Illinois Infantry

 

The 36th Illinois was in Odycke’s Brigade and in reserve about 500 yards north of the Carter House. These Opdycke troops were called into action to stem the Confederate breech around the Carter House when some CSA units broke through the main and interior Federal lines during the battle.

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The Carter House | Franklin, Tennessee

 

 

Hand-written account from 33rd Alabama Infantry regimental history tells of carnage around cotton gin

John Witherspoon DuBose wrote the original regimental history for the 33rd Alabama Infantry. Here is an excerpt of his hand-written account of the post-battle scene of carnage around the Carter cotton gin. I have estimated that between 1,000 and 1,200 Confederate casualties occurred in this two acre area, with somewhere near 200 Confederate’s outright killed.

Great description by 100th Illinois solider (Lane’s Brigade) at Franklin, and artifacts

Pvt. – Sgt. Andrew W. Johnson
100 Illinois Infantry co. D. His Residence Plain field Illinois Enlisted 8/1/1862 as a Private. Promotions Sergt. He mustered out on 6/12/1865
Here`s some great information about Sgt. Johnson at the battle of Franklin Tennessee,
“We arrived at Franklin about noon, the enemy closely following us. Schofields corps were then behind a good line of works, our division was placed in line in front of them, and some slight works thrown up hurriedly. We could see Hood`s army marching over the hills, south of us. and watch them form their lines. Then commenced the battle, the enemy charging us in great force about four o`clock. We were compelled to leave the first line, falling back to the second line of works. and there the battle raged till almost nine p.m. The enemy charged the works five times, some of them being killed close on them. Gen. Clayborne and his horse fell right on our works. The fighting was terrific. We were now behind the works, and the enemy in the open field, almost the first battle in which the 100th had this advantage. There was a small grove of young locust trees just in front of part of our line,  every tree of which was cut off by bullets. The enemy withdrew having been repulsed each time. Clayborne`s division was nearly annihilated. Our list of casualties was again a sad one, for we lost one of the most valued of our remaining officers. Maj. Rodney S. Bowen was wounded in the thigh, and was placed in the last ambulance that started for Nashville, and died at that place three days after.  Michael Murphy our brave color sergeant, Co. C. was shot down while planting the colors in the face of the foe. and when Murphy fell, Andrew W. Johnson of co. D. sprang forward and snatched the colors and saved them from capture, for which he was made color sergeant.”
Source for excerpt and image: