What is your Battle of Franklin literacy?

I recently surveyed over 3,000 people about their experience with tours of the Franklin battlefield and related sites.

Here’s the first question with results:

The kind of Battle of Franklin Tour I’m interested in would be for someone who . . .

  • Is a beginner really, doesn’t know much about the battle (14%)
  • Is familiar with Franklin but can’t go too deep on the details (23%)
  • Is fairly knowledgeable already, and is looking to extend their knowledge beyond the average person (36%)
  • Is already quite well-versed on the Franklin story, but would really like a deep-dive into a couple special areas (27%).

Interesting that some 37% are basically newbies to just familiar with the battle, and 63%consider themselves fairly knowledgeable to well-versed. Shows that this Facebook group has a large percentage of people who consider themselves fairly knowledgeable about the battle. 

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Current issue of Civil War Times (Apr 2015) has great article by Stephen M. Hood on the ‘myth’ of John Bell Hood’s doping at Spring Hill-Franklin

For all of those people, including published historians, who have always thought that John Bell Hood was doped out on laudanum at Spring Hill and Franklin, you better check your uneducated assumptions against the facts that are now indisputable.  Stephen M. Hood sets the record straight. Here are some screen shots of the current issue of CWT (April 2015). The article starts at page 30.

April 2015 Issue of Civil War Times

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Gen. John Bell Hood

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Excerpt at the very end of the article below:

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Hood scholar-author to speak at upcoming FCWRT, signing his new book on “Hood’s Lost Papers”

Stephen M. “Sam” Hood will be signing his new book, The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood, at the February 8th Franklin Civil War Roundtable in Franklin.  This is event is free to the public and begins at 3:00 PM.  Sunday, February 8th  2015 at the Franklin Police Headquarters at 900 Columbia Pike.

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The book can be pre-ordered on Amazon.

From the Publisher:

Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 10.58.00 PMScholars hail the find as “the most important discovery in Civil War scholarship in the last half century.” The invaluable cache of Confederate General John Bell Hood’s personal papers includes wartime and postwar letters from comrades, subordinates, former enemies and friends, exhaustive medical reports relating to Hood’s two major wounds, and dozens of touching letters exchanged between Hood and his wife, Anna. This treasure trove of information is being made available for the first time for both professional and amateur Civil War historians in Stephen “Sam” Hood’s The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood.

The historical community long believed General Hood’s papers were lost or destroyed, and numerous books and articles were written about him without the benefit of these invaluable documents. In fact, the papers were carefully held for generations by a succession of Hood’s descendants, and in the autumn of 2012 transcribed by collateral descendent Sam Hood as part of his research for his book John Bell Hood: The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of a Confederate General (Savas Beatie, 2013.)

This collection offers more than 200 documents. While each is a valuable piece of history, some shed important light on some of the war’s lingering mysteries and controversies. For example, several letters from multiple Confederate officers may finally explain the Confederate failure to capture or destroy Schofield’s Union army at Spring Hill, Tennessee, on the night of November 29, 1864. Another letter by Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee goes a long way toward explaining Confederate Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne’s gallant but reckless conduct that resulted in his death at Franklin. Lee also lodges serious allegations against Confederate Maj. Gen. William Bate. While these and others offer a military perspective of Hood the general, the revealing letters between he and his beloved and devoted wife, Anna, help us better understand Hood the man and husband.

Historians and other writers have spent generations speculating about Hood’s motives, beliefs, and objectives, and the result has not always been flattering or even fully honest. Now, long-believed “lost” firsthand accounts previously unavailable offer insights into the character, personality, and military operations of John Bell Hood the general, husband, and father.

Author Sam Hood

Author Sam Hood

Stephen M. “Sam” Hood is a graduate of Kentucky Military Institute, Marshall University (bachelor of arts, 1976), and a veteran of the United States Marine Corps. A collateral descendent of General John Bell Hood, Sam is a retired industrial construction company owner, past member of the Board of Directors of the Blue Gray Education Society of Chatham, Virginia, and is a past president of the Board of Directors of Confederate Memorial Hall Foundation in New Orleans. Sam resides in his hometown of Huntington, West Virginia and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina with his wife of thirty-five years, Martha, and is the proud father of two sons: Derek Hood of Lexington, Kentucky, and Taylor Hood of Barboursville, West Virginia.

Imagine how holographic technology could transform the way we “see” a Civil War battlefield today

Companies like Microsoft, Google and Apple are working diligently to mainstream holographic technology for the average user.  Watch this very cool video.  Imagine standing in front of a modern shopping mall that was a former Civil War battlefield and being able to see what the original battlefield looked like?  That’s not all.  Holographic technology will allow the user to see the troops movements and action on that spot too.  We’r not too far from this being reality for the heritage community.

Though very rudimentary, the City of York has launched the first-ever hologram tour app for the smartphone. It’s in the iTunes store now.

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Museums may offer holograms featuring famous figures relaying stories, narration and commentary about relevant displays and exhibits. Instead of just viewing a spectacular piece of artwork, imagine watching as the artist describes his or her creation and offers insight into its inspiration.

Reality augmented sightseeing goes way beyond just educating visitors about the history and culture of a city. It actually immerses them into the environments of years gone past and offers them the chance to witness significant events that shaped the city or region.

Reconstructed images of long-gone historic landmarks superimposed on their original sites give visitors the feeling they have travelled back in time. They can watch the evolution of a city’s skyline over time and see how it looked at different times throughout history.

Source: http://the-insider.biz/index.php/issues/special-edition-2014/item/333-hologram-technology-and-tourism/333-hologram-technology-and-tourism

Examples of museums (or similar) using holographic technology:

  • The Gerald R. Ford Museum – take a holographic tour of the Ford White House.
  • Sailor’s Creek Battlefield State Park – Exhibits also features state-of-the-art holographic storytellers and artifacts native to the battles of Sailor’s Creek.