36th Illinois soldier is killed on Carter House lawn, story comes full-circle more than 150 years later

One of our Facebook members – Kendyl Wallis – recently shared this story with us:

“The Colonel of my G-G grandfathers regiment, Colonel Porter Olson, 36th Illinois, was killed on the Carter House lawn. A shutter was torn from the house to use as a litter to carry him to the rear. About 10 years ago I was at Carnton, and I met a descendant of Fountain Branch Carter. We had a pleasant visit, and I pulled out my wallet and offered to reimburse her family for the shutter. We had a good laugh about that!”Lieutenant-Colonel Porter C. Olson, 36th Illinois Infantry

 

The 36th Illinois was in Odycke’s Brigade and in reserve about 500 yards north of the Carter House. These Opdycke troops were called into action to stem the Confederate breech around the Carter House when some CSA units broke through the main and interior Federal lines during the battle.

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The Carter House | Franklin, Tennessee

 

 

Great description by 100th Illinois solider (Lane’s Brigade) at Franklin, and artifacts

Pvt. – Sgt. Andrew W. Johnson
100 Illinois Infantry co. D. His Residence Plain field Illinois Enlisted 8/1/1862 as a Private. Promotions Sergt. He mustered out on 6/12/1865
Here`s some great information about Sgt. Johnson at the battle of Franklin Tennessee,
“We arrived at Franklin about noon, the enemy closely following us. Schofields corps were then behind a good line of works, our division was placed in line in front of them, and some slight works thrown up hurriedly. We could see Hood`s army marching over the hills, south of us. and watch them form their lines. Then commenced the battle, the enemy charging us in great force about four o`clock. We were compelled to leave the first line, falling back to the second line of works. and there the battle raged till almost nine p.m. The enemy charged the works five times, some of them being killed close on them. Gen. Clayborne and his horse fell right on our works. The fighting was terrific. We were now behind the works, and the enemy in the open field, almost the first battle in which the 100th had this advantage. There was a small grove of young locust trees just in front of part of our line,  every tree of which was cut off by bullets. The enemy withdrew having been repulsed each time. Clayborne`s division was nearly annihilated. Our list of casualties was again a sad one, for we lost one of the most valued of our remaining officers. Maj. Rodney S. Bowen was wounded in the thigh, and was placed in the last ambulance that started for Nashville, and died at that place three days after.  Michael Murphy our brave color sergeant, Co. C. was shot down while planting the colors in the face of the foe. and when Murphy fell, Andrew W. Johnson of co. D. sprang forward and snatched the colors and saved them from capture, for which he was made color sergeant.”
Source for excerpt and image:

Upcoming lecture by Prof Thomas Flagel: “War, Peace and Typhoid: Union Occupation of Franklin during the Civil War” on Oct. 4

The Spring Hill Home Page (newspaper) just posted this article:

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Prof. Thomas Flagel, image courtesy of Spring Hill Homepage

Columbia State Community College Associate Professor of History Dr. Thomas Flagel will present “War, Peace and Typhoid: Union Occupation of Franklin during the Civil War” on Oct. 4 at 6 p.m. in the Community Room at the Williamson Campus.

During the Civil War, the Battle of Franklin lasted five hours; however, federal occupation of Williamson County lasted more than two years. At one point, a Union garrison outnumbered the local population by more than 10 to one.

“For more than two years, Union troops, white civilians and African Americans coexisted in Franklin in a tenuous, volatile and unforeseen situation,” Flagel said. “Almost completely forgotten by our generation, the occupation of Franklin radically altered theirs. What they saw and what they did may shock, inspire or repulse a modern audience. It is time we learn of their story.”

Flagel will explore the causes and effects of this massive buildup, as well as how it transformed the racial, political, economic and environmental landscape of the region.

He earned his bachelor’s in history from Loras College, a master’s in European history from Kansas State University, a master’s in international relations from Creighton University and a doctorate of public history from Middle Tennessee State University.

The Community Room is located on the second floor of the Administration Building on the Williamson Campus at 1228 Liberty Pike, in Franklin, Tennessee. The lecture is free and open to the public.

12th TN Cav Lt Col involved in Hood’s Retreat

12th-tn-cavCharles C. Huefling was 29 years old when he enlisted. He was commissioned into Field & Staff at 1st Lt., on 1/11/1864 of the 12th Tennessee Cavalry (U.S.).  He saw promotions to Major on 3/24/1864 and Lt Col on August 16, 1864. He also saw service in Company M, 4th US Army Cavalry.

Huffing saw action at Franklin and participated in Hood’s Retreat.

Twelfth Cavalry. 

— Col.,George Spalding Lieut.-Cols. Charles C. Huefling, John S. Kirwan, Maj s., Sater Boland,  Jason A. Bradshaw. James W. Spalding.

This regiment was organized by companies, the first of which was mustered into service Aug. 24, 1863.  On Feb. 22, 1864, six companies had been mustered, and George Spalding was commissioned lieutenant-colonel.

The regiment was then assigned to Gen. Gillem’s division and was placed on guard duty on the Nashville & Northwestern railroad, where it remained until April, 1864.  During the remainder of the year the regiment was in active service almost continuously.

It was one of the most efficient regiments in opposing Wheeler on his raid through Middle Tennessee and had several severe engagements with portions of his command.  In the latter part of September it marched to contest the approach of Gen. Forrest, with whom it was several times engaged with considerable loss.

It was also active in the campaign against Hood, participating in the battles at Lawrenceburg, Campbellsville, Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville.  From Nashville the regiment was in the advance in pursuit of Hood and fired the last shot at the enemy as he crossed the Tennessee River at Bainbridge.

On Feb. 8, 1865, the regiment went into camp at Eastport, Miss., where it remained until May 11.  It was then transferred from the 2nd to the 1st brigade under the command of Bvt. Brig-Gen. George Spalding, who had been commissioned colonel upon the completion of the regiment Aug. 16, 1864, and ordered to St. Louis.

It was there remounted and refitted and sent to Fort Leavenworth, at which place, after having performed some escort and scout duty through northern Kansas and southern Nebraska, it was mustered out Oct. 7.

It returned to Nashville and was there finally paid and discharged Oct. 24, 1865.