Civil War Pen and Watercolor Drawing of Plantation House that Served as General Ruger’s Headquarters at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee sells at auction for just $646.00

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Auction listing: Pen and watercolor on paper, titled in the work Hd Qrs, Brig. Gen. T.H. Ruger, Com’d’g 3rd Brig. 1st Div. 12th Corps / Tullahoma, Tenn., 1864.

Provenance:

Descended Directly in the Family of General Thomas H. Ruger

Source: Cowan’s Auction, June 2014

Original 59th Illinois frock coat worn at Franklin-Nashville goes for over $5,200.00 at auction

Civil War Frock Coat Belonging to Sam’l. F. Patton, Co. A., 59th ILL.

Cowan’s Auction: June 2014

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A partial auction description:  A fine navy blue wool nine-button single-breasted frock coat worn by 1st Lieut. Samuel F. Patton, Co. A. 59th Illinois, sold with Patton’s relic Staff & Field sword, a post-war GAR walking stick, and a letter of provenance from family descendants.

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A Fundraising Event for Battlefield Preservation

lovellprop

$150,000 for the Battlefield
A Fundraising Event for Battlefield Preservation
October 16, 2014

On a single night in mid-October, The Battle of Franklin Trust will attempt to secure $150,000 toward the purchase of the Lovell property, which is adjacent to The Carter House.

Once part of the Carter family garden, the Lovell property was caught in the midst of the some of the most furious fighting during the Battle of Franklin. It is currently home to the Flower Shop and Williamson County CASA, both of which will relocate elsewhere in Franklin after the purchase. On May 27, The Battle of Franklin Trust and Franklin’s Charge jointly entered into a contract and agreed to raise $2.8 million in one year to complete the purchase of the property. Encompassing 1.6 acres, the land will become part of the 20-acre Carter’s Hill Battlefield Park.

Local developer Calvin Lehew recently committed to lead the fundraising charge with a $50,000 donation. At least five other donors have contributed amounts of at least $5,000 each and the Trust aims to raise the remaining $75,000 on or before Oct. 16.

This signature kickoff event will be held at The Carter House on Thursday, Oct.16 from 4 to 7 p.m. Funds raised will be allocated entirely toward the Lovell property project. The property is perhaps the most important piece of Civil War battlefield in American that has yet to be preserved. It is also a crucial component of the Carter’s Hill Park that is emerging along Columbia Pike.

During the $150,000 For The Battlefield event, donation and pledge tables will be set up around the historic site for guests to contribute to the cause. To reach its goal, the Trust will need at least 300 individuals or organizations to each make a minimum $250 donation, but any larger contribution is welcome. Pledges may be made as long as they are fulfilled by May 31, 2015.

“This one of a kind event is an opportunity for the local community to engage in battlefield preservation and make a profound impact,” said Battle of Franklin Trust CEO Eric A. Jacobson. “Saving this property is a legacy that future generations, both here in Franklin and across the country, will appreciate for generations to come.”

The Carter House is located at 1140 Columbia Ave, Franklin, TN 37064. Catering will be provided by Copper Kettle and drinks will be provided by Red Dog Wine & Spirits. Three John Paul Strain historic art prints, all depicting events at Spring Hill and Franklin, will be auctioned during the event, and all donors will receive a free Battle of Franklin Trust annual membership as well as an “I Helped Save the Battlefield” t-shirt. For more information, please call Laurie McPeak at 615-794-0903.

http://battleoffranklintrust.org/battlefield_preservation.htm

41st Ohio soldier (images) fought at Franklin, personal items sold at auction

Corporal C.B. Strickland, 41st Ohio Volunteers

Screen Shot 2014-10-23 at 9.22.51 PMCowan’s listing (in part): In August of 1861, after enlisting as a Private at the age of 20, Strickland was mustered into Co. B of the 41st OVI. Initially under the command of Colonel William Babcock Hazen and often referred to as “Hazen’s Brigade” because of the successes it achieved through his leadership, the 41st Ohio was a hard-fighting regiment that saw action at Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Stone’s River, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, New Hope Church, the Atlanta Campaign, Franklin, and Nashville. Near the end of his Civil War service, Strickland was promoted Corporal on March 31, 1865, and he was mustered out in November, 1865, at Camp Chase, OH. Following the war, Strickland resided in Bristolville, OH, and records indicate that he was still alive in 1908.

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Source: Cowan’s Auction, November 2013

Massive Gen. Ruger (3rd WI) correspondence goes at auction for almost $33,000

Partial auction listing:

One of the notable features of the collection is that for much of the war, the correspondence is two way, including Ruger’s letters to his wife and hers back. Ruger was often reticent to relay details on the battles he experienced, assuming both that his wife would read about things in the newspapers and that she would not want to hear the gore. His letters, however, reflect his interests in the politics of the military and his relentless, hard-boiled attitude toward conducting warfare.

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In the first week of November, Ruger was offered command of a Division in 28th Corps in Tennessee under George Thomas unless Sherman and Slocum (who did not want to have him leave their command) could offer him one. Ruger describes his meeting with Sherman: “I gave [Sherman] Gen. Slocum’s letter and remarked that if the two Corps of the Army of the Cumberland the 14th and 20th were to be operated as an army it would place Gen. Williams in command of the 20th Corps and that would give me the Division during the campaign at least. He shook his head and said enough to let me know he had no such intention and directed the order for my transfer to be made out, said that it was not a good plan to ‘stay too long in one hole’ and besides Gen Schofield was very anxious to have me come.” He received command of 2nd Div., 28 Corps, shortly before the Battle of Franklin, where he would earn a lasting reputation.

The correspondence relating to Franklin begins with a no nonsense letter from Schofield on Nov. 28: “I want you to make your position perfectly secure so as to render it impossible for the enemy to effect a crossing at that place. You may retain the guns which you have without horses even at the risk of losing them. If the bridge is not sufficiently burned to render it useless to the enemy complete it tonight under the cover of darkness….” There are five more orders from Nov. 29 and 30 (the day of the battle), beginning with the order for J.D. Cox to march into Franklin and dig in while Ruger covers until all have passed. At 8 a.m. on the 29th, word the order went out “The enemy is coming in force above us,” ordering Ruger to leave a regiment to guard the river. When it was over, Ruger described the Battle of Franklin to his wife: “The attack of the enemy was very strong and determined much the hardest I have seen west a good deal like the attacks of [Stonewall] Jackson. We repulsed the enemy with loss, but as A.J. Smith’s command and other were not up we fell back here where they are for concentration. The force we had was much smaller than the enemy….” The collection also includes a handsome field map of the area along the Duck River, Tenn., and a post-war letter from Gen. Jacob Dolson Cox — who is often credited with saving the center of the line at Franklin (where Ruger was located) — requesting information on the battle to combat critics.

1849-1865; ca 865 items (ca 775 war date).

Source: Cowan’s Auction, June 2009