Just how intense was the action around the Carter cotton gin at Franklin?

Just how intense was the fighting around the cotton gin at the Battle of Franklin? The pictures below shows a general area of roughly two square acres, where the cotton gin was on 30 Nov. After studying the casualties and battlefield accounts, and many other records – over many years – I have concluded that there were at least 100 Confederate dead (possibly 150-200) in this small two acre section, and another 800-1,000 wounded, lying on the field, waiting for assistance. After the battle, the Confederate soldiers who were not injured began walking among areas of the battlefield like this, where the action was hottest. Comforting their wounded. Confirming the dead. Carrying the wounded to local ‘hospitals’ in the homes of residents and the local churches. With some 800-1,200 casualties (just wounded and killed) in this two-acre section a person attending to the wounded after the battle could attend to one comrade, then turn in any direction and walk 8-10 feet and attend to another. The another . . . and another. And don’t forget, right in front of the Federal line, in the trench, the dead were likely piled 4-6 high. Imagine 1,000 people today, lying down in this two acre section, symbolizing the casualties around the Carter cotton gin.

New Google Map of Fort Granger

Fort Granger is a large, mostly intact earthenworks Civil War fort just north of downtown Franklin, above Pinkerton Park. It sits on roughly twelve acres. Fort Granger was constructed by Federal soldiers, and some contraband labor, in the late winter and early spring of 1863. It took about ten weeks to complete.

I recently created a Google Map version of Fort Granger. It is loaded with all kinds of information to help you learn more about the fort, including access to original soldier’s letters and accounts.

To learn more about Fort Granger via an interactive Google Map, visit this site.

Earl Van Dorn tested the fort as it was being constructed in April 1863 and Nathan Bedford Forest attempted to take the fort in June 1864. Two Confederate spies were hung outside the fort in June 1863 too.

I have been leading tours of Fort Granger for ten years. If you would like to walk around the fort facility and learn who built it, why it was built, how it was built, how it was used, then contact me for a tour. Fort Granger tours (typically 75 minutes) are $35 per person, group rates available.