New Google Map of Fort Granger

Fort Granger is a large, mostly intact earthenworks Civil War fort just north of downtown Franklin, above Pinkerton Park. It sits on roughly twelve acres. Fort Granger was constructed by Federal soldiers, and some contraband labor, in the late winter and early spring of 1863. It took about ten weeks to complete.

I recently created a Google Map version of Fort Granger. It is loaded with all kinds of information to help you learn more about the fort, including access to original soldier’s letters and accounts.

To learn more about Fort Granger via an interactive Google Map, visit this site.

Earl Van Dorn tested the fort as it was being constructed in April 1863 and Nathan Bedford Forest attempted to take the fort in June 1864. Two Confederate spies were hung outside the fort in June 1863 too.

I have been leading tours of Fort Granger for ten years. If you would like to walk around the fort facility and learn who built it, why it was built, how it was built, how it was used, then contact me for a tour. Fort Granger tours (typically 75 minutes) are $35 per person, group rates available.

A Confederate soldier wounded at the Battle of Franklin falls in love with a local resident while being cared for in a field hospital

screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-12-20-19-pmCapt William F. Gibson, a Confederate soldier from Arkansas, was wounded in the face and stomach at the Battle of Franklin, November 30, 1864, fighting around the Carter Cotton Gin with Cleburne’s Division. Lying wounded and bleeding on the field, he was saved by a Union soldier, who recognized he was a Mason.

Gibson was carried to the doorstep of the Cummins’s House in Franklin where he was found by a young single woman named Laura Sowell who was visiting her uncle at the time. Miss Sowell was from Columbia and single at the time.

Laura nursed William these first few days and they eventually fell in love, writing letters to one another right after the Franklin conflict, and even 30 years later.

They never married. William was shamed by his disfigured wounds from Franklin and did not think he was good enough for Laura. She later married a prominent businessman in Columbia, Tennessee.

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Here are some pictures of the former Cummins’ home now located at 403 Cummins Street just a little south of downtown Franklin, very close to the Lots House.

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Confederate William F. Gibson, 8th Arkansas Infantry, was wounded in this vicinity where the original Carter cotton gin was positioned, and was found the next day by a Union soldier who noticed William wearing a Masonic pin. The Union soldier carried the wounded Gibson to the home of Dr. Cummins (pictured above) where he was cared for and tended by local Miss Laura Sowell, whom he fell in love with.