Booknote: Twenty-five Hours to Tragedy; The Battle of Spring Hill and Operations on November 29, 1864: Precursor to the Battle of Franklin

Amazon states:

Screen Shot 2016-02-26 at 9.11.25 PM.pngTwenty-five Hours to Tragedy: The Battle of Spring Hill and Operations on November 29, 1864 – Precursor to the Battle of Franklin is a compilation of eyewitness testimony linked by narrative telling the story of the great missed opportunity by the Confederate Army of Tennessee on November 29, 1864. Led by General John Bell Hood, a Confederate envelopment around Columbia, Tennessee left Union Major General John McAllister Schofield’s Fourth and Twenty-third Army corps strung out and beyond supporting distance of their wagon train. One lone division that had been sent to Spring Hill to protect the Union Army’s wagon train found itself confronting nearly 25,000 Confederate soldiers by mid-afternoon. While Union Major General David S. Stanley did all in his power to stop the Confederate attack, it seemed nothing could save them. Suddenly the fog of war set in, and as the sun sank on the western horizon, the Confederate high command found itself paralyzed with inaction, indecision, poor judgment and finally darkness. This maneuver forced General Schofield to conduct a harrowing forced march to Spring Hill past nearly 22,000 highly motivated Rebel soldiers within a few hundred yards of Columbia-Franklin Pike as darkness cloaked the field. While the Federals marched into a set Confederate trap that was never fully sprung, Confederate commanders stumbled through the starlight, and the Union army slipped past the lion’s den. The next day brought about the Battle of Franklin – a direct result of Confederate inaction and miscommunication the night before at Spring Hill. Twenty-five Hours to Tragedy is the largest and most in depth account of the actions that took place at Spring Hill. This account adds more testimony and sheds even greater light on a night filled with confusion and disappointment for the Confederate high command. Told by over one-hundred-and-fifty eyewitness participants, the accounts are linked by narrative that place the reader on the field in the midst of enthusiastic Confederate and anxious Union soldiers. The events of November 29, 1864 sealed the fate of the Confederate Army of Tennessee. Only twenty-five hours after the Confederate Army’s arrival on the battlefield of Spring Hill, the decision to assault the heavily defended fortifications at Franklin was made. It was a decision that would not have to be made had the Confederates followed through with their plans at Spring Hill. Follow the armies in their race to Spring Hill, the combat there and the critical decisions that led to the Federal escape and a total Confederate command breakdown in the most devastating blunder of the American Civil War.

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John Bell Hood’s Division makes assault on Federal left flank at 4:30pm on July 2nd, 1863

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john_bell_hood.jpgGen. John Bell Hood’s Confederate division, made up mostly of Texans, Arkansans, and Alabamians, made their assault upon the far left Federal flank at Gettysburg on July 2nd, 1863. Gen. Sickles’ men
occupied the area around Devil’s Den but were pushed out by the Confederate’s coming from the northwest. Hood’s division then made their way across Plum Run Creek and headed up towards Little Round Top. Hood was struck by shell fragments at Gettysburg, severely wounding his left arm.

CDV of Rose O’Neal Greenhow (1814-1864), a noted Confederate spy,

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Cowan’s is auctioning off this CDV (ends Sunday)

I’ve copied the exact catalog description as posted don the site.

Mathew Brady CDV titled, Mrs. Greenhow and Daughter, Imprisoned in the Old Captiol, Washington, D.C. and dated 1862. Mrs. Greenhow sits in a chair in a black laced mourning dress while her daughter moves in closer to her with her hand on her mother’s shoulder. 

Rose O’Neal Greenhow (1814-1864) was a noted Confederate spy, caught in the act of espionage and imprisoned in Washington, D.C. Greenhow was a Washington socialite who dined and conversed with presidents, generals, senators, and high-ranking military officers. She relayed important information to Confederate generals and controlled a pro-Southern spy network with her handler, Thomas Jordan. Jefferson Davis praised Greenhow’s pivotal intelligence work and credited the victory of the First Battle of Bull Run to her. She was caught and captured in August of 1861 and put under house arrest. When the government discovered she was still an active spy they imprisoned her and her daughter for five months. She was deported to the Confederate States where she traveled to Richmond, Virginia and received new diplomatic tasks. She sailed to France and Britain to represent the Confederacy and gain their favor. There, she wrote and published her memoir in London. Her returning ship to America ran aground in 1864 off Wilmington, North Carolina. She drowned when her rowboat overturned during her escape of a Union gunboat. The Confederacy honored her with a military funeral.