Upcoming lecture by Prof Thomas Flagel: “War, Peace and Typhoid: Union Occupation of Franklin during the Civil War” on Oct. 4

The Spring Hill Home Page (newspaper) just posted this article:

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Prof. Thomas Flagel, image courtesy of Spring Hill Homepage

Columbia State Community College Associate Professor of History Dr. Thomas Flagel will present “War, Peace and Typhoid: Union Occupation of Franklin during the Civil War” on Oct. 4 at 6 p.m. in the Community Room at the Williamson Campus.

During the Civil War, the Battle of Franklin lasted five hours; however, federal occupation of Williamson County lasted more than two years. At one point, a Union garrison outnumbered the local population by more than 10 to one.

“For more than two years, Union troops, white civilians and African Americans coexisted in Franklin in a tenuous, volatile and unforeseen situation,” Flagel said. “Almost completely forgotten by our generation, the occupation of Franklin radically altered theirs. What they saw and what they did may shock, inspire or repulse a modern audience. It is time we learn of their story.”

Flagel will explore the causes and effects of this massive buildup, as well as how it transformed the racial, political, economic and environmental landscape of the region.

He earned his bachelor’s in history from Loras College, a master’s in European history from Kansas State University, a master’s in international relations from Creighton University and a doctorate of public history from Middle Tennessee State University.

The Community Room is located on the second floor of the Administration Building on the Williamson Campus at 1228 Liberty Pike, in Franklin, Tennessee. The lecture is free and open to the public.

84th Indiana Strength Report – March 1864

The 84th Indiana was in Grouse’s Brigade, Kimball’s Division at Franklin.  I acquired this Strength Report of the 84th Indiana for March 1864 not too long ago.

The goldmine is in the bottom third of the document. The writer details copies notes about numerous 84th men and what their status is.

For example, Cpl William Pittengen is a deserter; he lists men in the hospitals in Nashville, mentions name after name of soldiers (e.g., Rufus Taylor, David Mohler, Francis Wincett, Col Champion, Benton Skinner, Capt John C Taylor, 1st Lt Mcclure who is detached to Fort Granger by order of Gen Gordon Granger.  Many more soldier’s names are listed.

The 84th helped construct Fort Granger in Franklin from March-May 1863.  The 84th mustered in at Richmond, Indiana.

It was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 4th Army Corps about Feb 1864.

The detail in the document is relevant in getting a better handle on the strength of the 84th Indiana following their action Chickamauga and Chattanooga in late 1863, then at Buzzard’s Roost, GA in late February 1864.

It is for sale

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12th TN Cav Lt Col involved in Hood’s Retreat

12th-tn-cavCharles C. Huefling was 29 years old when he enlisted. He was commissioned into Field & Staff at 1st Lt., on 1/11/1864 of the 12th Tennessee Cavalry (U.S.).  He saw promotions to Major on 3/24/1864 and Lt Col on August 16, 1864. He also saw service in Company M, 4th US Army Cavalry.

Huffing saw action at Franklin and participated in Hood’s Retreat.

Twelfth Cavalry. 

— Col.,George Spalding Lieut.-Cols. Charles C. Huefling, John S. Kirwan, Maj s., Sater Boland,  Jason A. Bradshaw. James W. Spalding.

This regiment was organized by companies, the first of which was mustered into service Aug. 24, 1863.  On Feb. 22, 1864, six companies had been mustered, and George Spalding was commissioned lieutenant-colonel.

The regiment was then assigned to Gen. Gillem’s division and was placed on guard duty on the Nashville & Northwestern railroad, where it remained until April, 1864.  During the remainder of the year the regiment was in active service almost continuously.

It was one of the most efficient regiments in opposing Wheeler on his raid through Middle Tennessee and had several severe engagements with portions of his command.  In the latter part of September it marched to contest the approach of Gen. Forrest, with whom it was several times engaged with considerable loss.

It was also active in the campaign against Hood, participating in the battles at Lawrenceburg, Campbellsville, Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville.  From Nashville the regiment was in the advance in pursuit of Hood and fired the last shot at the enemy as he crossed the Tennessee River at Bainbridge.

On Feb. 8, 1865, the regiment went into camp at Eastport, Miss., where it remained until May 11.  It was then transferred from the 2nd to the 1st brigade under the command of Bvt. Brig-Gen. George Spalding, who had been commissioned colonel upon the completion of the regiment Aug. 16, 1864, and ordered to St. Louis.

It was there remounted and refitted and sent to Fort Leavenworth, at which place, after having performed some escort and scout duty through northern Kansas and southern Nebraska, it was mustered out Oct. 7.

It returned to Nashville and was there finally paid and discharged Oct. 24, 1865.