Category Archives: Confederates

17th Mississippi Infantryman from Franklin was a veteran of many battles before he fought in his home town late in the war.

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William J. Bateman grew up in Franklin and married Sallie Nichols. They moved to Mississippi and he joined the 17th Mississippi Co I Inf.

Photo credit: Mary Nichols Britt collection in the Tennessee State Archives.

He mustered in 6/1/61. Depending on his verified war records he may have seen action at Bull Run I, Ball’s Bluff, Antietam, Perryville, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Vicksburg Chickamauga, Fort Sanders, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Franklin and Nashville.

Current issue of Civil War Times (Apr 2015) has great article by Stephen M. Hood on the ‘myth’ of John Bell Hood’s doping at Spring Hill-Franklin

For all of those people, including published historians, who have always thought that John Bell Hood was doped out on laudanum at Spring Hill and Franklin, you better check your uneducated assumptions against the facts that are now indisputable.  Stephen M. Hood sets the record straight. Here are some screen shots of the current issue of CWT (April 2015). The article starts at page 30.

April 2015 Issue of Civil War Times

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Gen. John Bell Hood

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Excerpt at the very end of the article below:

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3rd Miss color bearer dies of wounds at Franklin

Sixth Plate Ambrotype of Confederate Color-Bearer Ensign John J. Cherry, 3rd Mis

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Auction partial listing: died of wounds received at Franklin. An early likeness of John Cherry at about 18 years of age likely taken at the time of his enlistment in Company C., 3rd Mississippi Infantry in September 1861, identified by old folded slip of paper in case having penciled “J.J. Cherry.” 

The 3rd Miss was part of Loring’s Division, Featherston’s Brigade. Jacobson says that Cherry was shot in the upper right arm and died of his wounds in January 1865.

Source: Cowan’s auction, 2006

New book on Confederate deaths & burials in Nashville 1861-1865

Historian Timothy L. Burgess has recently published a significant work on Confederate deaths burials in Nashville. Perhaps no one knows this subject better than Mr. Burgess, who has been researching the subject for nearly four decades.

Burgess book cover

 

To order the book:

$22.00 with postage
Send check or MO to:
Tim Burgess
128 Maple Dr.
Hendersonville, TN 37075

64th Ohio letter written in early December 1864

This letter was auctioned off in 2013 and provides some interesting detail about rebel activity after the Battle of Franklin as well as casualty numbers for the 64th Ohio Infantry.

Private Frank Ashley

Co. H, 64th Ohio Volunteers

Camp Near Nashville Tenn

December 8 – 64

“…it is reported the railroad is cut between here and Louisville…it is also reported that the (rebels) are falling back in the direction of Franklin Tenn But they are visible in our front also hear cannonading up the river…I have not heard of W T Sherman for some time but he is alright with out doubt The non veterans of our Regt will be mustered out soon which will make it Small having a heavy loss in the late Battle of Franklin our loss is 121 men killed wounded and missing…”

letter