Very rare war-dated signature of Major-General Patrick R. Cleburne for sale

I want to share an incredible artifact I am offering through my online store, The Civil War Shoppe. It is an extremely rare, war-dated signature of Confederate Major-General Patrick R. Cleburne. Is it expensive, yes? Is it rare? A war-dated signature of Cleburne is nearly impossible to find.  Click on the link or email me to handle payment details – $3,695.00 (firm).
https://the-civil-war-shoppe.myshopify.com/blogs/news/very-rare-war-dated-signature-of-major-general-patrick-cleburne-for-sale

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Sample Cleburne sigantures

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Confederate soldier from Arkansas saved by a fellow Mason who was a Union soldier

Capt. William F. Gibson, Co I, 8th Arkansas Infantry

A descendant of William F. Gibson sent me this picture of the Arkansas Confederate who served in Govan’s Brigade, Cleburne’s Division while at Franklin. The 8th Arkansas Infantry fought near the Cotton Gin.

According to family records and post-war accounts, Gibson was carrying the colors of the 8th Arkansas when the Confederate assault upon the Cotton Gin took place.  He was shot through the face with a ball, and in the stomach.  Lying on the field, and bleeding to death, a Union soldier noticed the wounded Confederate and was apparently going to finish him off when another Union soldier noticed Gibson was wearing a Masonic pin [see pic of an 1863 Masonic pin]. Despite being enemies on the field their Masonic fraternity rose beyond the blood of the battlefield.

The nearly fatally wounded Gibson was allowed to be carried to a local resident’s home, the Cummins’ – whose house was used as a civilian post-battle hospital. A local resident named Laura attended to Gibson and saved his life.  Mrs. Lucy Cummins attempted to disguise the Confederate soldier from Arkansas who wanted to escape from Franklin and take his chances of recovering further south.

However, his flight to Columbia took place the same time the Federal Army came back through Franklin in mid December as they were chasing Hood’s whipped Army of Tennessee that had just been decimated at Franklin and Nashville (Dec 15-16, 1864).  Gibson was captured and sent to Camp Chase in Ohio as a Union prisoner of war.

Gibson survived the war and moved back to Arkansas where he died in 1907. There is a lot more to this story. Stay tuned.

Update (2/25/16): see my research file on the Gibson story on ScribD

The Cummins’ home

Nice crowd attends Franklin Round Table’s talk about St. John’s Church

A very nice crowd came out today to listen to Maury County historian Bob Duncan, talk about the history behind St. John’s Church, in Columbia, Tennessee. The church is rarely open to the public. The Franklin Civil War Round Table sponsored today’s event.

St. John’s is famous for what Confederate General Patrick R. Cleburne is supposed to have said about it in late November 1864 when he was passing it, on the way to Franklin just days later. He is supposed to have remarked to aides something to the effect, “This church is such lovely place. One would almost wish to die so one could be buried here.” Cleburne would indeed lose his life just days later at Franklin and his remains were initially interred here by Chaplain Charles Todd Quintard.

Cleburne was supposedly originally buried in this area (below) behind the church.

A memorial plaque was installed on the church exterior in 1947 and reads as follows:

Erected in 1842 for worship and spiritual instruction of white and negro people, built under
supervisions of the Rt. Rev. Leonidas Polk, Bishop of Louisiana, on land given by him and with labor and materials contributed by him and his brothers, R.K. Polk, G.W. Polk, L.J. Polk, and Dr. W.J. Polk. Delivered into care and custody of the Bishop of Tenn. as the property of the Diocese of Tenn.

Consecrated Sept 4, 1842, by Rt. Rev. James Hervey Otey, D.D., Bishop of Tenn., assisted by Bishop Polk.

Bishop Otey, whose remains rest in the church-yard, was born Jn. 27, 1800; consecrated in Christ Church, Philadelphia, Jan. 14, 1834; died April 23, 1863, in Memphis, Tenn.

At the Battle of Franklin in Nov. 1864, the following Confederate Generals were killed, and among others were buried in St. John’s Church-yard by Chaplain Charles Todd Qunitard, M.D., their bodies afterward being removed to their respective states.

Maj.-Gen. Patrick Cleburne   Brig. Gen. H.B. Granberry

Brig. Gen O.P. Strahl   Brig. Gen. S.R. Gist

Annual pilgrimages, held on the last Sunday in May with services led by Bishop of Tenn., were initiated in 1921.

Custody and upkeep of the property is in charge of St. John’s Association, organized May 25, 1924.

Rt. Rev. James M. Mason, D,D. President, Wm Dudley Gale, Treas.

This memorial erected 1947 by

Diocese of Tennessee

St. John’s Association

Tennessee Historical Commission

I took a lot of photos of the exterior (grounds and cemetery), the interior, and the exterior of the church itself. They are accessible from this Flickr gallery.

Historian Bob Duncan gave a very informative and entertaining talk about the church. The last regular meeting in the church was in 1915. Since then it only hosts an annual service on Whitsunday.

Vandals did a lot of damage to the church in 2001 but the community pulled together to clean it up and ready it for the annual service just a couple weeks later.

There has never been any significant restoration done to the church since its consecration in 1842. It is in remarkable condition. The bricks and wood used for the construction of the church, and its furniture, were all provided on site.

The Polk family of Columbia, Tenn., built the church as a family/plantation church.

March 11 Franklin Civil War Round Table offers special opportunity for members to see Saint John’s Church in Columbia.

March promises to be one of the most incredible hand’s on meetings we will have as we meet at St John’s Church just outside Columbia.  It was in this church’s cemetery that Patrick Cleburne, when passing it before the Battle of Franklin, noted its beauty and said it would be a good place to be laid to rest.  In a touch of irony, he was buried there after his death at Franklin until his removal to Arkansas in 1870.  Maury County historian Bob Duncan will speak at this event and show us some of the incredible gravesites of history buried there.  And for those who wish to explore more, the burial site of Sam Watkins (Company Aytch) is just a couple of miles away.  St John’s is not often open to the public, so you will not want to miss this incredible opportunity.