Category Archives: Preservation

What is your Battle of Franklin literacy?

I recently surveyed over 3,000 people about their experience with tours of the Franklin battlefield and related sites.

Here’s the first question with results:

The kind of Battle of Franklin Tour I’m interested in would be for someone who . . .

  • Is a beginner really, doesn’t know much about the battle (14%)
  • Is familiar with Franklin but can’t go too deep on the details (23%)
  • Is fairly knowledgeable already, and is looking to extend their knowledge beyond the average person (36%)
  • Is already quite well-versed on the Franklin story, but would really like a deep-dive into a couple special areas (27%).

Interesting that some 37% are basically newbies to just familiar with the battle, and 63%consider themselves fairly knowledgeable to well-versed. Shows that this Facebook group has a large percentage of people who consider themselves fairly knowledgeable about the battle. 

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Hood scholar-author to speak at upcoming FCWRT, signing his new book on “Hood’s Lost Papers”

Stephen M. “Sam” Hood will be signing his new book, The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood, at the February 8th Franklin Civil War Roundtable in Franklin.  This is event is free to the public and begins at 3:00 PM.  Sunday, February 8th  2015 at the Franklin Police Headquarters at 900 Columbia Pike.


The book can be pre-ordered on Amazon.

From the Publisher:

Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 10.58.00 PMScholars hail the find as “the most important discovery in Civil War scholarship in the last half century.” The invaluable cache of Confederate General John Bell Hood’s personal papers includes wartime and postwar letters from comrades, subordinates, former enemies and friends, exhaustive medical reports relating to Hood’s two major wounds, and dozens of touching letters exchanged between Hood and his wife, Anna. This treasure trove of information is being made available for the first time for both professional and amateur Civil War historians in Stephen “Sam” Hood’s The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood.

The historical community long believed General Hood’s papers were lost or destroyed, and numerous books and articles were written about him without the benefit of these invaluable documents. In fact, the papers were carefully held for generations by a succession of Hood’s descendants, and in the autumn of 2012 transcribed by collateral descendent Sam Hood as part of his research for his book John Bell Hood: The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of a Confederate General (Savas Beatie, 2013.)

This collection offers more than 200 documents. While each is a valuable piece of history, some shed important light on some of the war’s lingering mysteries and controversies. For example, several letters from multiple Confederate officers may finally explain the Confederate failure to capture or destroy Schofield’s Union army at Spring Hill, Tennessee, on the night of November 29, 1864. Another letter by Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee goes a long way toward explaining Confederate Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne’s gallant but reckless conduct that resulted in his death at Franklin. Lee also lodges serious allegations against Confederate Maj. Gen. William Bate. While these and others offer a military perspective of Hood the general, the revealing letters between he and his beloved and devoted wife, Anna, help us better understand Hood the man and husband.

Historians and other writers have spent generations speculating about Hood’s motives, beliefs, and objectives, and the result has not always been flattering or even fully honest. Now, long-believed “lost” firsthand accounts previously unavailable offer insights into the character, personality, and military operations of John Bell Hood the general, husband, and father.

Author Sam Hood

Author Sam Hood

Stephen M. “Sam” Hood is a graduate of Kentucky Military Institute, Marshall University (bachelor of arts, 1976), and a veteran of the United States Marine Corps. A collateral descendent of General John Bell Hood, Sam is a retired industrial construction company owner, past member of the Board of Directors of the Blue Gray Education Society of Chatham, Virginia, and is a past president of the Board of Directors of Confederate Memorial Hall Foundation in New Orleans. Sam resides in his hometown of Huntington, West Virginia and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina with his wife of thirty-five years, Martha, and is the proud father of two sons: Derek Hood of Lexington, Kentucky, and Taylor Hood of Barboursville, West Virginia.

Original 59th Illinois frock coat worn at Franklin-Nashville goes for over $5,200.00 at auction

Civil War Frock Coat Belonging to Sam’l. F. Patton, Co. A., 59th ILL.

Cowan’s Auction: June 2014

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A partial auction description:  A fine navy blue wool nine-button single-breasted frock coat worn by 1st Lieut. Samuel F. Patton, Co. A. 59th Illinois, sold with Patton’s relic Staff & Field sword, a post-war GAR walking stick, and a letter of provenance from family descendants.

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A Fundraising Event for Battlefield Preservation


$150,000 for the Battlefield
A Fundraising Event for Battlefield Preservation
October 16, 2014

On a single night in mid-October, The Battle of Franklin Trust will attempt to secure $150,000 toward the purchase of the Lovell property, which is adjacent to The Carter House.

Once part of the Carter family garden, the Lovell property was caught in the midst of the some of the most furious fighting during the Battle of Franklin. It is currently home to the Flower Shop and Williamson County CASA, both of which will relocate elsewhere in Franklin after the purchase. On May 27, The Battle of Franklin Trust and Franklin’s Charge jointly entered into a contract and agreed to raise $2.8 million in one year to complete the purchase of the property. Encompassing 1.6 acres, the land will become part of the 20-acre Carter’s Hill Battlefield Park.

Local developer Calvin Lehew recently committed to lead the fundraising charge with a $50,000 donation. At least five other donors have contributed amounts of at least $5,000 each and the Trust aims to raise the remaining $75,000 on or before Oct. 16.

This signature kickoff event will be held at The Carter House on Thursday, Oct.16 from 4 to 7 p.m. Funds raised will be allocated entirely toward the Lovell property project. The property is perhaps the most important piece of Civil War battlefield in American that has yet to be preserved. It is also a crucial component of the Carter’s Hill Park that is emerging along Columbia Pike.

During the $150,000 For The Battlefield event, donation and pledge tables will be set up around the historic site for guests to contribute to the cause. To reach its goal, the Trust will need at least 300 individuals or organizations to each make a minimum $250 donation, but any larger contribution is welcome. Pledges may be made as long as they are fulfilled by May 31, 2015.

“This one of a kind event is an opportunity for the local community to engage in battlefield preservation and make a profound impact,” said Battle of Franklin Trust CEO Eric A. Jacobson. “Saving this property is a legacy that future generations, both here in Franklin and across the country, will appreciate for generations to come.”

The Carter House is located at 1140 Columbia Ave, Franklin, TN 37064. Catering will be provided by Copper Kettle and drinks will be provided by Red Dog Wine & Spirits. Three John Paul Strain historic art prints, all depicting events at Spring Hill and Franklin, will be auctioned during the event, and all donors will receive a free Battle of Franklin Trust annual membership as well as an “I Helped Save the Battlefield” t-shirt. For more information, please call Laurie McPeak at 615-794-0903.

41st Ohio soldier (images) fought at Franklin, personal items sold at auction

Corporal C.B. Strickland, 41st Ohio Volunteers

Screen Shot 2014-10-23 at 9.22.51 PMCowan’s listing (in part): In August of 1861, after enlisting as a Private at the age of 20, Strickland was mustered into Co. B of the 41st OVI. Initially under the command of Colonel William Babcock Hazen and often referred to as “Hazen’s Brigade” because of the successes it achieved through his leadership, the 41st Ohio was a hard-fighting regiment that saw action at Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Stone’s River, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, New Hope Church, the Atlanta Campaign, Franklin, and Nashville. Near the end of his Civil War service, Strickland was promoted Corporal on March 31, 1865, and he was mustered out in November, 1865, at Camp Chase, OH. Following the war, Strickland resided in Bristolville, OH, and records indicate that he was still alive in 1908.

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Source: Cowan’s Auction, November 2013