I’m going to lead-facilitate a discussion of the Battle of Franklin starting in August through the free forums at Civil War Talk.  We will be reading Eric Jacobson’s book, For Cause and For Country.   Learn more about this and join in!

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The following was submitted by a descendant:

Wilson_Blain_LoganWilson Blain Logan, born June 30, 1830, was the son of James Logan, a pioneer settler of Greenfield, Ohio. Wilson taught school in the winter and in the summer followed the painter’s trade. He later moved to Jeffersonville, Ohio, where he operated a grocery store until the outbreak of the Civil War.

When President Lincoln first called for volunteers, Wilson Logan enlisted in the 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The entire regiment was captured at Harper’s Ferry in September 1862 and members were exchanged as prisoners on the condition that they would not re-enlist for a period of two years.

Mr. Logan went back home to his family in Jeffersonville, Ohio, where, in March 1863, he was appointed Postmaster. At the end of the two years, he was given permission by the Governor of Ohio to organize a company of infantry, which he did and the company was assigned to the 175th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was given the rank of Captain of Company D at Camp Dennison (near Milford, Ohio).

After completion of training, the company was assigned to the army of Tennessee under General Thomas of Nashville. When Confederate General Hood turned his forces to fight Thomas’ army in Nashville, Captain Logan was stationed with his company at a blockhouse in Southern Tennessee and was ordered to join Thomas at Nashville. On the road to Nashville, Captain Logan’s company was ordered to make a stand against the enemy at Franklin, Tennessee, and Captain Logan was killed.

For more info

From the Tennessean (read)

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My blog readers may want to check out this new book on Gen Jacob Cox by Gene Schmeil.

Cox book

Professor Steven E. Woodworth says this about Gene’s book:

“This is a comprehensive biography of … a very important figure, not only in Civil War military history but also in political and religious matters. This book makes a significant contribution by relating in a thoughtful, analytical way the life and career of one of the most important Ohioans of that era. The author has clearly done his homework, and the text is not only well researched but very polished.”

Steven E. Woodworth, professor of history, Texas Christian University

For more info

Historian Timothy L. Burgess has recently published a significant work on Confederate deaths burials in Nashville. Perhaps no one knows this subject better than Mr. Burgess, who has been researching the subject for nearly four decades.

Burgess book cover

 

To order the book:

$22.00 with postage
Send check or MO to:
Tim Burgess
128 Maple Dr.
Hendersonville, TN 37075

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Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

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Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

Make sure to check-out the Google Map of the Franklin Civil War Guide.
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