Tag Archives: 8th Georgia Infantry

Civil War soldiers ‘buried the hatchet’, have we?

As I have been involved in the past couple of weeks communicating with and learning about the two living sons of Civil War soldiers coming to visit Franklin for our reburial event this weekend I have been struck by the graciousness of the two sons and especially their fathers (who actually fought ‘against’ one another).

James Brown, Sr’s father – James H.H. Brown – did not hold ill-will against his Northern neighbors after the war:

“He was not bitter. He did not have the least bit of bitterness toward the Yankees,” Brown said about his father, who was wounded twice in fighting. (Tennessean, Oct 4th, 2009)

And Charles Conrad Becker’s magnanimous spirit equaled Brown’s:

“He saw those Confederates coming at him and in his estimation they were brave souls,” Becker said. (Tennessean, Oct 4th, 2009)

Brown_Becker_both-pic by kwmcnutt.

We can learn a lot from these fathers-sons today.

These primary participants, men who spilled one another’s blood, and watched it spilled on American soil, found the generosity of spirit to look past sectarian interests, geographic-myopia, and just plain hate as they looked one another in the eyes in the reunions for many years after the Civil War ended and saw a real human being  who was caught up in an absurd nightmare of unconscionable proportions between 1861-1865.

In short, many if not most of the actual participants in the Civil War buried the hatchet in the immediate years after the war ended.

Where is that same spirit of reconciliation and generosity today?

I’m haunted frequently by the words of Franklin’s resident-novelist Robert Hicks who seems to never miss an opportunity to ask this question, “What is the relevance of the Civil War today?”

Though some today might believe the American Civil War is NOT over, the real relevance today regarding the Civil War is how have we healed as a nation since that great divide almost 150 years ago, and perhaps there still is some reconciliation that needs to take place?

Some would still prefer to cling to symbols (on either side) that inflame, divide, and express our differences.  People do this today through the flags they still wave or fly outside their walls, the stodgy arguments they still make, the uniforms they still wear, and the hidden-agendas they bring to another board meeting.

Discussions have been taking place all over the community in Franklin regarding the identity of the unknown soldier we are reburying this Saturday.  “He was Union!”  “He was Confederate!” And the arguments take off.  There are solid cases for each side.

I suggest we all find the magnanimous spirit imbued in the very hearts of Charles Conrad Becker and James H.H. Brown – men who spilled their own blood during the Civil War – and as we welcome their sons to our community this weekend we do so with open arms from a community that continues to seek reconciliation and healing because when we rebury that unknown soldier on Saturday we first and foremost acknowledge him as an American soldier who died for a vision that he thought would make America better 150 later.

Are we a better America today?

Franklin re badge 1914 by you.

Courtesy, The Williamson County Historical Society

James H.H. Brown (8th GA) fought in wheatfield at Gettysburg

J.H.H. Brown

James Brown, Sr.’s father – James H.H. Brown – was a member of the 8th Georgia Infantry. The 8th was in Hood’s division at Gettysburg and among the action they saw on July 2nd was fighting in the wheatfield.

CSA General John Bell Hood was wounded severely in the arm on July 2nd and was carried off the field. Hood would later lead the Army of Tennessee into middle Tennessee commanding the Confederate army at Franklin.

… The third advance was made in connection with the entire line on that part of the field, and resulted, after a conflict in the ravine of one-half hour, in the rout of the enemy from the field. This rout was vigorously pressed… The loss of the enemy was here very great, his dead lying upon the field by the hundred. Nothing but the exhausted condition of the men prevented them from carrying the heights.

[Major H. D. McDaniel, cmdg. 11th Ga. Reg., O.R. Series I, Vol XXVII, Part 2, pg. 401-402]

Elizabeth Plank wrote: “… an ambulance arrived at the farm house and without any ceremony forced open the front door and carried in a wounded officer and placed him in the guest room and the best bed in the house… all over the floors in the halls on the porches in the out buildings, on the barn floor and every place were wounded men… many limbs and arms were amputated and their wounds dressed, while the battle raged. These wounded soldiers were left at this hospital five or six weeks after the fight. Every morning they buried their dead in shallow graves in the orchards…”

[From “A Vast Sea of Misery” by Gregory Coco, p. 143]

“… The third advance was made in connection with the entire line on that part of the field, and resulted, after a conflict in the ravine of one-half hour, in the rout of the enemy from the field. This rout was vigorously pressed… The loss of the enemy was here very great, his dead lying upon the field by the hundred. Nothing but the exhausted condition of the men prevented them from carrying the heights.”
[Major H. D. McDaniel, cmdg. 11th Ga. Reg., O.R. Series I, Vol XXVII, Part 2, pg. 401-402]
Read the 17th Maine Infantry’s Adjutant Charles W. Roberts’ account “At Gettysburg in 1863 and 1888.”

csa_wheatfield_brown by you.

For a more complete story of the wheatfield action see.