Category Archives: Telegram

Telegram: hold Franklin for three days?

 

(Telegram.)
NASHVILLE, November 30, 1864.
MAJOR GENERAL SCHOFIELD, Franklin:
General Smith reported to me this morning that one division of his troops is still behind. We must therefore try to hold Hood where he now is until these troops can get up and the steamers return. After that we will concentrate here, reorganize our cavalry, and try Hood again. Do you think you can hold Hood at Franklin for three days longer? Answer, giving your views; and I should like to know what Wilson thinks he can do to aid you in holding Hood.
(Signed)
GEO. H. THOMAS.
Major-General U. S. Vols., Comd’g.

 

Telegram: getting in a tight place

 

(Telegram.)
FRANKLIN, November 30, 1864–12 M.
MAJOR-GENERAL THOMAS, Nashville:
Your despatch of 10.25 A.M. is received. I am satisfied that I have heretofore run too much risk in trying to hold Hood in check, while so far inferior to him in both infantry and cavalry. The slightest mistake on my part, or failure of a subordinate, during the last three days, might have proved disastrous. I don’t want to get into so tight a place again. Yet I will cheerfully act in accordance with your views of expediency, if you think it important to hold Hood back as long as possible. When you get all your troops together, and the cavalry in effective condition, we can whip Hood easily, and, I believe, make the campaign a decisive one. Before that, the most we can do is to husband our strength and increase it as much as possible. I fear the troops which were stationed on the river below Columbia will be lost. I will get my trains out of the way as soon as possible, and watch Hood carefully. Possibly I may be able to hold him here, but do not expect to be able to do so long.
(Signed)
J.M. SCHOFIELD,
Major-General.

 

Telegram: map

(Telegram.)
NASHVILLE, November 30, 1864.
MAJOR-GENERAL SCHOFIELD, Franklin:
Your despatches of 5.30, 5.50, and Wilson’s despatch, forwarded to yon, have been received. It will take Smith quite all day to disembark, but if I find there is no immediate necessity to retain him here, will send him to Franklin or Brentwood, according to circumstances. If you can prevent Hood from turning your position at Franklin, it should be held; but I do not wish you to risk too much. I send you a map of the environs of Franklin.
(Signed)
GEO. H. THOMAS,
Major-General U. S. Vols., Comd’g.

Telegram: Hood cannot be held

 

(Telegram.)
FRANKLIN, November 30, 1864–9.50 A.M.
MAJOR-GENERAL THOMAS, Nashville:
My trains are coming in all right. Half the troops are here, and the other half about five miles out, coming on in good order, with light skirmishing. I will have all across the river this evening. Wilson is here, and his cavalry on my flank I do not know where Forrest is. He may have gone east, but no doubt will strike our flank and rear again soon. Wilson is entirely unable to cope with him. Of course, I cannot prevent Hood from crossing the Harpeth whenever he may attempt it. Do you desire me to hold on here until compelled to fall back
(Signed)
J.M. SCHOFIELD,
Major-General.

 

Telegram: troops across the Harpeth

 

(Telegram.)
FRANKLIN, November 30, 1864–5.30 A.M.
MAJOR-GENERAL THOMAS, Nashville:
I hope to get my troops and material safely across the Harpeth this morning. We have suffered no material loss so far. I shall try to get Wilson on my flank this morning. Forrest was all around us yesterday, but we brushed him away during the evening, and came through. Hood attacked in front and flank, but did not hurt us.
(Signed)
J.M. SCHOFIELD,
Major-General.