Category Archives: Fort Granger

The landscape shapes the battlefield

This map of the battlefield (on an interpretative marker on the Eastern Flank) is very helpful for one to orient oneself to the Battle of Franklin. There is so much to appreciate from studying this map. Here are a list of questions any good student of the Battle of Franklin would know, or at least want to know. The map below can answer each question.

  1. How far east-west was the Confederate Army spread out while positioned at Winstead Hill?
  2. Once the CSA Army got to the main Union earthworks, centered at the Cotton Gin, how far east-west was the army spread out then?  Why is this important?
  3. What are the three main arteries the CSA Army traversed to get to ground zero (i.e., the Carter grounds)?
  4. What were the primary obstacles (i.e., man-made and natural) that the Union Army used to defend itself?
  5. What were the ‘high spots’ (natural and man-made) that both sides attempted to leverage?
  6. How far was Fort Granger and her guns from the McGavock farm? From the CSA Army as it approached the Union defensive main line?
  7. How does the landscape and important items noted impact the chances of a successful cavalry flanking maneuver by Forrest?
  8. How and why was the Harpeth River an important advantage to the Union Army?

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Granger gun range.pngBoth images from interpretative markers on the Eastern Flank

Civil War play – Incident at Fort Granger – offers a single performance June 24th

INCIDENT AT FORT GRANGER a play about a true event that happened at Franklin’s Fort Granger in June of 1863, will be performed in the Pull-Tight Theatre on Sunday afternoon, June 24, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets for this one-time-only performance are $15.00. The production is a fundraiser, proceeds to be used for this summer’s theatre renovation. Order tickets.

Jim Anderson and Vince Cusomato

104th Ohio soldier – Adam Weaver – writes in vivid detail about action he saw at Franklin

The 104th Ohio Infantry was placed right beside the Carter cotton gin at the Battle of Franklin.  The men in that area of the field saw some of the most horrific and intense fighting during the battle. One Union soldier in the 104th Ohio, who survived the battle, wrote a vivid detail of the action from his point of view.

“These rebel boys were ordered to advance and were led upon a death as certain and sure to be met with, as there was a God in Heaven. Right into the fury of a foe mostly concealed from their view and worthy of their valor,” Adam Weaver wrote.

“The shells from our rifled cannons located north of town, tore dreadful gaps, in the ranks of the rebels, with only the visible effects of causing them to close up the openings and press ever forward.”

The “shells from our cannons located north of town” were no doubt coming from the guns of Fort Granger on Figuer’s Bluff, just north of the Harpeth River.

Source for Weaver quote

Virtual tour of Fort Granger: the Middle bastion

Fort Granger has three bastions.  The map shows the location of each one.

By definition a bastion is:

a projecting work in a fortification designed to permit fire to the flanks along the face of the wall.

When entering the fort from the parking lot one walks right up to the middle bastion. You will be standing facing the MIddle bastion, looking south.

Armament (i.e., artillery) was placed in the cul de sac of each bastion. There were 30 pounders in Granger.

Each bastion sits roughly 15 feet from the ditch on the outside.

This Google map shows the relative position of Fort Granger in the larger scope of the battlefield (Franklin). Notice the Harpeth River running in front of the fort and the railroad to the west side (running north/south).

The Eastern flank portion of the Franklin battlefield was in the direct spray of artillery from Granger. Thus, Loring’s Division, and more specifically, Featherston’s Brigade, took the worst of the Federal onslaught of artillery from Granger.

Here is a video showing the middle bastion just as you enter the fort.

To order my book on Fort Granger, or to learn more click on http://www.FortGranger.US

Volunteer this Saturday (Park Day) to help clean up Fort Granger

The Civil War Trust has announced its 16th Annual Park Day, a national effort to clean up and raise community awareness of Civil War related historic sites. The City of Franklin Parks Dept has joined with the CWT by encouraging volunteers to help clean up Fort Granger vegetation on Saturday March 31, 2012.

This project is in conjunction with the Franklin’s Battlefield Preservation Commission’s intent to prepare the Park for the sesquicentennial anniversary of the Battle of Franklin. It is our hope to improve and interpret Fort Granger in a way that encourages a more thoughtful and educational framework, and to bring more awareness to the significance of the Fort’s role in the Battle of Franklin.

To sign up please email parksinfo@franklintn.gov  to request a simple registration/release form or go to City of Franklin : Parks to download a form. Please bring gloves and pruners and lots of enthusiasm. We will supply water and drinks. For more information please call Deanna at 794-2103.