Category Archives: Carrie McGavock

The Orphan Mother – new novel by Robert Hicks

hicks-bookRobert’s latest novel, THE ORPHAN MOTHER, is an epic tale of one remarkable woman’s quest for justice.

In the years following the Civil War, Mariah Reddick, former slave to Carrie McGavock – the “Widow of the South” – has quietly built a new life for herself as a midwife to the women of Franklin, Tennessee. But when her ambitious, politically minded grown son, Theopolis, is murdered, Mariah – no stranger to loss – finds her world once more breaking apart. How could this happen? Who wanted him dead?

Mariah’s journey to uncover the truth leads her to unexpected people – including George Tole, a recent arrival in town, fleeing a difficult past of his own – and forces her to confront the truths of her own past. Brimming with the vivid prose and historical research that has won Robert Hicks recognition as a “master storyteller” (San Francisco Chronicle), THE ORPHAN MOTHER is the unforgettable story of one woman’s heroic struggle in the face of overwhelming adversity and the undeniable strength of a mother’s love.

Order it now!

Photo gallery of the Franklin illumination ceremony

It was a glorious evening in Franklin tonight as hundreds – perhaps even thousands – came out to Carnton Plantation to attend the 145th commemoration of the Battle of Franklin.  10,000 candles were illuminated and placed in scores of rows on the Eastern Flank at Carnton to honor the 10,000 estimated casualties that occurred at Franklin (November 30, 1864).

A full photo gallery of the event is here. Also check out my videos on my YouTube folder.

Caring for the wounded and dying after the battle

Franklin, Tennessee, probably only had a population between 2,000 residents in 1864. That includes children. The Battle of Franklin resulted in up to 10,000 casualties: killed, wounded, missing, etc.  Franklin residents banded together on the morning of December 1st, 1864, and opened their homes, churches and businesses to tend to the incredible suffering and carnage. One of those homes was that of John and Carrie McGavock.

Historian Eric Jacobson recounts that challenge in this video.

Also: see this video of Dr. Chris Lossom talk about the carnage after the battle too.