Category Archives: Booknote

Hood scholar-author to speak at upcoming FCWRT, signing his new book on “Hood’s Lost Papers”

Stephen M. “Sam” Hood will be signing his new book, The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood, at the February 8th Franklin Civil War Roundtable in Franklin.  This is event is free to the public and begins at 3:00 PM.  Sunday, February 8th  2015 at the Franklin Police Headquarters at 900 Columbia Pike.

FCWRT_logo.2

The book can be pre-ordered on Amazon.

From the Publisher:

Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 10.58.00 PMScholars hail the find as “the most important discovery in Civil War scholarship in the last half century.” The invaluable cache of Confederate General John Bell Hood’s personal papers includes wartime and postwar letters from comrades, subordinates, former enemies and friends, exhaustive medical reports relating to Hood’s two major wounds, and dozens of touching letters exchanged between Hood and his wife, Anna. This treasure trove of information is being made available for the first time for both professional and amateur Civil War historians in Stephen “Sam” Hood’s The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood.

The historical community long believed General Hood’s papers were lost or destroyed, and numerous books and articles were written about him without the benefit of these invaluable documents. In fact, the papers were carefully held for generations by a succession of Hood’s descendants, and in the autumn of 2012 transcribed by collateral descendent Sam Hood as part of his research for his book John Bell Hood: The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of a Confederate General (Savas Beatie, 2013.)

This collection offers more than 200 documents. While each is a valuable piece of history, some shed important light on some of the war’s lingering mysteries and controversies. For example, several letters from multiple Confederate officers may finally explain the Confederate failure to capture or destroy Schofield’s Union army at Spring Hill, Tennessee, on the night of November 29, 1864. Another letter by Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee goes a long way toward explaining Confederate Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne’s gallant but reckless conduct that resulted in his death at Franklin. Lee also lodges serious allegations against Confederate Maj. Gen. William Bate. While these and others offer a military perspective of Hood the general, the revealing letters between he and his beloved and devoted wife, Anna, help us better understand Hood the man and husband.

Historians and other writers have spent generations speculating about Hood’s motives, beliefs, and objectives, and the result has not always been flattering or even fully honest. Now, long-believed “lost” firsthand accounts previously unavailable offer insights into the character, personality, and military operations of John Bell Hood the general, husband, and father.

Author Sam Hood

Author Sam Hood

Stephen M. “Sam” Hood is a graduate of Kentucky Military Institute, Marshall University (bachelor of arts, 1976), and a veteran of the United States Marine Corps. A collateral descendent of General John Bell Hood, Sam is a retired industrial construction company owner, past member of the Board of Directors of the Blue Gray Education Society of Chatham, Virginia, and is a past president of the Board of Directors of Confederate Memorial Hall Foundation in New Orleans. Sam resides in his hometown of Huntington, West Virginia and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina with his wife of thirty-five years, Martha, and is the proud father of two sons: Derek Hood of Lexington, Kentucky, and Taylor Hood of Barboursville, West Virginia.

New book on Gen Jacob Cox out

My blog readers may want to check out this new book on Gen Jacob Cox by Gene Schmeil.

Cox book

Professor Steven E. Woodworth says this about Gene’s book:

“This is a comprehensive biography of … a very important figure, not only in Civil War military history but also in political and religious matters. This book makes a significant contribution by relating in a thoughtful, analytical way the life and career of one of the most important Ohioans of that era. The author has clearly done his homework, and the text is not only well researched but very polished.”

Steven E. Woodworth, professor of history, Texas Christian University

For more info

New book on Confederate deaths & burials in Nashville 1861-1865

Historian Timothy L. Burgess has recently published a significant work on Confederate deaths burials in Nashville. Perhaps no one knows this subject better than Mr. Burgess, who has been researching the subject for nearly four decades.

Burgess book cover

 

To order the book:

$22.00 with postage
Send check or MO to:
Tim Burgess
128 Maple Dr.
Hendersonville, TN 37075

Jacobson’s book finally available in Kindle format

Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 4.58.49 PMA lot of us have been waiting for Eric Jacobson’s book to be published in Kindle format. Here it is.

For Cause & For Country offers a balanced and richly detailed study of the battles that helped to decide the outcome of the Civil War. Students of Spring Hill and Franklin will appreciate the abundance of new information which will show that the battles had a far greater scope and importance than many previously realized. Those not familiar with the story will find themselves drawn to the incredible events of late 1864, when Middle Tennessee stood center stage as the divided nation defined and repaired itself through blood and fire. – Book description

Coming soon: The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood

Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 5.02.23 PMTo be published in August 2014, Amazon says: Scholars hail the find as “the most important discovery in Civil War scholarship in the last half century.” The invaluable cache of Confederate General John Bell Hood’s personal papers includes wartime and postwar letters from comrades, subordinates, former enemies and friends, exhaustive medical reports relating to Hood’s two major wounds, and dozens of touching letters exchanged between Hood and his wife, Anna. This treasure trove of information is being made available for the first time for both professional and amateur Civil War historians in Stephen “Sam” Hood’s The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood.