Chaplain the 90th Ohio Infantry writes of Hood’s retreat and Confederate dead after Franklin

The following letter was retrieved online on October 6, 2018 (Cowan’s Auction)

William C. Holliday (1838-1921) was born in Adams County, Ohio. The Minutes of Ohio Annual Conference of Methodist Episcopal Church described him as a “local preacher” as early as 1855. Holliday enlisted on December 21, 1863, as a chaplain and was commissioned into Field & Staff OH 90th Infantry. Holliday mustered out on June 13, 1865 at Camp Harker, TN.

Franklin Tenn Dec 18, 1864
1st Division Hospital 4 AC

Ma

Yesterday morning we moved easily in the AM. Our troops had moved rapidly after the panic stricken and fleeing rebels about four miles. It was night. They slept on the mud and under the rain. It rained all day – but this Army is so flushed with victory that they did splendid marching – though tired and worn from two days incessant fighting and almost sleepless nights. We came about fifteen miles. Rebels are still going. It is the greatest victory of the war….”

And writing to his wife from the Field Hospital ….

Six Miles North Columbia Tenn.”[Dec 19]

Mrs. Holliday,

It is about 7oclock PM. I sent you a very brief letter on the 18 at Franklin. On this same day we marched about 14 miles through the rain. At Franklin I had an opportunity of circling over the battlefield. The rebels suffered terribly. They assaulted our works and were killed by the hundred. I counted on one side the pile over three hundred and fifty graves. There were as many on the other side…”

Source: Cowan’s

 

Officers of the 38th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Spectacular Half Plate Outdoor Tintype

This tintype is currently offered (Oct 2018) on Cowan’s Auction site.

Text & images source: Cowan’s

Anonymous, half plate tintype featuring officers and enlisted men of the 38th Indiana Infantry, taken around Murfreesboro, TN in April of 1863, while the 38th was encamped there following the Battle of Stones River. This spectacular outdoor image shows the men gathered around an open tent, with a captain’s desk figuring prominently in the scene. Image housed in a full pressed paper case, fully separated at spine.

Accompanying period label with embossed maker’s mark identifies all of the subjects, including Captain George Windell of Co. K, Captain William Leneau of Co. B, and Lieutenant James Low of Co. D. At the time this image was made, it is likely that Low had recently returned to the regiment after recovering from a serious head would received at Stones River. Low eventually took command of the 38th, but was killed at the Battle of Bentonville, NC, before the official commission and subsequent promotion was received. Additional paperwork included with lot provides more detailed biographical information of each subject, referencing official reports, company histories, and post-war memoirs.

 

Take a tour of the Battle of Franklin on Nov 30th with me!

I will be offering two separate four hour Battle of Franklin tours on the 154th anniversary of the battle (November 30th). The first one will start at 8am and the second at 1pm. Rain or shine.

The cost is $150 per person (for the first ten guests; after that it is $200 per person). The tour will be from the perspective of Sun Tzu’s ‘Art of War.’

If interested email me at battleoffranklin@yahoo.com to RSVP.

I only get back to Franklin 2-3 times a year now so reserve your spot for the perfect day on the anniversary of the battle.

51st Ohio soldier tintype, survives Franklin

This image is currently (Oct 2018) offered on Cowan’s.

Sixth plate tintype and ribbon of Henry Hole, 51st OVI, presumably shown with his wife, wearing a state-style jacket without epaulets.  Hole first served in the 40th OVI until 1864, when he transferred to the 51st. While in the 40th Hole would have participated in the Battles of Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, and Franklin.

The 51st Ohio was in Whitaker’s Brigade, Kimball’s Division, on the Federal right flank.