10th Indiana Cav (125th Vol Infantry)

One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Regiment (10th Cavalry) Cols., Thomas N. Pace, George R. Swallow, Lieut.-Cols., Benjamin Q. A. Gresham, George R. Swallow, Thomas G. Williamson, Majs., George R. Swallow, George F. Herriott, Thomas G. Williamson, Sylvanus Milner, DeWitt C. James, George R. Mitchell.

This regiment, the 125th of the line, was organized during the fall and winter of 1862-63 at Vincennes and Columbus, was mustered in Feb.2, 1863, and left the state May 3, moving via Nashville to Pulaski, Tenn.

Assignment

At the time of the West Harpeth action the 10th IN Cav was 1st Brigade, 7th Division Cavalry, Military Division of the Mississippi.

Action

The detachment at Decatur, under Maj. Williamson, fought Hood’s forces for four days in October and a portion of the regiment, under Lieut.-Col. Gresham, was engaged at Nashville, Little Harpeth, Reynolds’ Hill and Sugar creek, losing 8 killed 43 wounded and 75 captured, but it captured 300 prisoners with their arms, and 4 stands of colors.

Sources:

  • Diaries
    Diary of Major William Whiteworth, Company K, 125th Indiana Regiment, March 8, 1864 – August, 1865. INHI. Smith Historical Society Library. Cited in: Guide to Indiana Civil War Manuscripts, 1965.
  • Archives and Manuscripts
    Louis Bernard DeMotte (author)
    Title: William Milton DeMotte, Union cavalryman and Hoosier doctor : his life and family /
    Indiana Historical Society – see citation
    DeMotte was a member of the 10th Indiana Cavalry regt; pages 15-30 apparently cover his service in the 10th.
  • Reenactors
    6th Alabama Cavalry , Montgomery, AL Maj. Brien McWilliams, brienmcw@aol.com
    A family oriented unit We have both mounted & dismounted companies. We attend reenactments throughout the state. We portray the 10th Indiana Cavalry when we put on blue(often).
  • Genealogy research
    • Dan and Judy Harvey are interested in the 10th Indiana Cav, particularly in John A. Cox, Company C
      d_jharvey@verizon.net.
    • Kraig McNutt’s wife had a 1st cousin in the 10th IN Cav; Thomas Gudgel of Company B. His parents were Andrew and Elvira Gudgel. Kraig can be reached at tellinghistory[at]yahoo.com

31 thoughts on “10th Indiana Cav (125th Vol Infantry)

  1. Dan Davis

    My great grandfather, Isaac Newton Foster. He was in Company C 10th Indiana Cavalry 125 Regiment. He died in 1927. My mother his granddaughter is 95 years old. She remembers him because he lived with her parents until his death. I am looking for any information on his unit.

    We were told he was captured and taken to Andersonville. He escaped and was caught and escaped and caught again. Was released when Wilson’s Cavalry corps set them free.

    Reply
  2. LINDA HARRIS

    MY GREAT GRANDFATHER, CARTER HARRIS, WAS IN THE INDIANA 10TH CALVARY AND GOT AN EYE DISEASE FROM THE MARCHING, AS FAR AS I CAN TELL. I AM SO PROUD OF HIM AND HIS EFFORTS, I SPENT THE ENTIRE EVENING LAST WEEK MEETING HIM ON THE INTERNET. I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN THE CIVIL WAR AND ANDERSONVILLE, SINCE I READ THE BOOK BY KANTOR. IT ALL FITS IN TO MY STRONG NEED TO FIND OUT ALL I CAN ABOUT THE WAR AND PRESIDENT LINCOLN. I AM SORRY ABOUT YOUR RELATIVE HAVING TO SPEND TIME IN ANDERSONVILLE. HARD TO BELIEVE THE CRUEL TREATMENT OF THE PRISONERS. NICE TO KNOW MAYBE OUR RELATIVES LIVED AND FOUGHT TOGETHER FOR THE CAUSE. LINDA HARRIS

    Reply
  3. Major Van Harl USAF Ret

    The below article is about the 24 Indiana Light Artillery-they fought in many of the same actions as the 10th Indiana Cav.

    TRYING TO KILL EACH OTHER

    One of my pre-Revolutionary War grandfathers was a Horton from Long Island, New York. Many of his direct descendents with that surname name were in Iowa when the Civil War broke out. Three brothers from Muscatine, Iowa joined the Union Army, Charles, James and Edwin. Lt. James L. Horton became an officer in the 8th Iowa Cavalry. In Aug of 1864 the 8th Iowa Cavalry was with Sherman on his march to Atlanta, Georgia. As the Confederates were being push out of Atlanta, they fell back to Lovejoy’s Station, which was a major supply depot. Sherman wanted it destroyed and this turned into the last win for the Confederates on the battlefield in the Civil War. Young Lt. Horton had just taken command of his unit. On the morning of 20 Aug in a rush to arms he grabbed one of his Sergeant’s jackets and rode off into battle. Lt. Horton was killed that day. He was wounded so many times that he either took a volley of rifle fire or was the victim of artillery grape shot. Grape shot is where you substitute the large cannon ball for a cloth packet of small rifle balls. When the bag is fired into a crowd of men, it opens up, spreads out and works like a giant shotgun. It is extremely nasty stuff and to this day the military still uses a form of grape shot. Lt. Horton’s body was not really recognizable, but his men knew it was him and they buried their young leader at Lovejoy’s Station.
    In 1866 James’ two brothers drove a horse and wagon team from Muscatine, Iowa to Lovejoy’s Station to remove his body from the battlefield and return it to Iowa. On the Iowa State Civil War Monument there is a statue of Lt. James Horton representing the cavalrymen of that state. The family was never really sure it was James they buried until years later at a reunion of the 8th Iowa Cavalry. The Sergeant whose jacket James had mistakenly put on that morning of his death was there to tell the family the story. With sadness the Horton family was relieved. I got a phone call the other day from a man named Hord. He had the pistol his Civil War grandfather had carried and wanted some information on restoring the handgun. We had such an enjoyable time speaking on the phone that we met for lunch later that week. Mr. Hord’s grandfather was in the First Texas Light Artillery known as the Douglas Artillery. It was the only Texas artillery unit to fight east of the Mississippi River. My civil war grandfather Private George Bennett on my mother’s side was in the 24th Indiana Light Artillery. The 24th Indiana and the Douglas Artillery were in multiple engagements, facing off against each other from 1863 to 1865. On 20 Aug 1864, the 24th Indiana Light Artillery, the Douglas Texas Artillery and the 8th Iowa Cavalry were at Lovejoy’s Station. There is a good chance that Lt. Horton was killed by canon grape shot, but by whose canon? The battlefield was very fluid and mistakes were made on both sides as to who they were firing at. It was a running gun battle with artillery firing and then moving quickly to a new location to fire again. Artillery units were firing counter battery fire at each other, as well as troops in the open. Mr. Hord’s grandfather was trying to kill my grandfather, and my grandfather Bennett was trying to kill Sergeant Tom Hord. In the process my distant relative Lt. Horton was killed. I can only assume if a Hord had killed a Bennett or the other way round at Lovejoy’s Station, I would not have been having a very enjoyable lunch the other day. One of us would not have been there. So what, this is old history? The word is secession. That was what the eleven southern states did when they left the Union in 1861. Secession is a word I see all too often in today’s communication. Texas and secession appear more and more on the internet. You can laugh it off at first but it really is not funny. The above related story was only a small part of my families’ involvement in the Civil War. I had Union and Confederate members fighting on the maternal and paternal sides of my family. Secession is ugly and civil war is even uglier. And we still have grape shot for our artillery in the form of flechettes–known as beehive rounds and they are the ugliest.

    16 Sept 2009
    Major Van Harl USAF Ret.
    vanharl@aol.com

    Reply
  4. William S Dean

    My great great grandfather, William T. Whetstone, was a member of Co. F., 10th Indiana Cavalry. He is buried in Lynville Cemetery, Lynville, Indiana. Trying to find out 1) If he was captured 2) If he was aboard the Sultana 3) If he was aboard the train which wrecked carrying 10th Indiana home 4) Anything else in particular about Co. F. Thanks!

    Reply
  5. Jan Zvara

    I am looking for William B. Coleman who was in Indiana 10th Cavalry Regiment Company U from 1864 to ?. He is absent from 1870 census so don’t know if he died in war or died of natural causes. Can’t find any document showing his military activity (other than activity date) and whether or not he survived the war. Any suggestions where I might find this information and detailed roster and history about the 10th Cavalry Company U? Thanks so much.

    Reply
  6. Wanda standish

    Mt great grandfather, Theodore Britain, served in “company M of the 10th Indiana cavalry” during the civil war. I read where Tom sent you a roster. Is there a way you send me this? I am in the process of writing my genealogy and any information would be appreciated.
    Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Hue

      A descendant from a captain in the 10th Indiana, Company C, attempted to sell a field officer’s desk, complete with ALL manuals, and logs/records on Pawn Stars (Season 2: “Deals from Hell” – Originally aired on June 21, 2011).

      Reply
  7. Karen

    does anyone know if there was an Almon Foster—
    here is what I have:Almon was a Captain in Co G of the 12th Indiana Cavalry Regiment, and served the Union from January 1864 until sometime in October, 1864. He apparently received a less than honorable discharge due to politics as he was caught speaking out and campaigning for General McClellan, who was running against the incumbant, Abe Lincoln.

    Reply
  8. Beth

    Hello,

    My great great grandfather, Elvis Lynch Fraim was a quarter master seargant in Company K 10th Indiana Cavalry 125 Regiment. Would anyone have a photograph of him?

    Thank you,

    Beth

    Reply
  9. Lynn

    My ancestor, William H. Saltzman was in Company K of the 10th Indiana Cavalry. He was from Posey County. He enlisted 6 March 1864 and died at Fort Gaines, AL in May 1865. Does he show up on any of the rosters that you have? I’m trying to fill in the details of his war experience.
    Thanks!
    Lynn

    Reply
  10. Dave Harbert

    My great grandfather was Joshua Barnes. He enlisted on Jan.14th 1864 10 th Indiana Cav. 125th reg. Co.I
    He was under the command of Capt. Buskirk. I have a photo of him when he enlisted. He was 18 and sitting very proudly in his uniform with sword in hand. It is the only known photo of my great grandfather. I will gladly send the picture if anyone is interested.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Please let me know if your great grandfather Joshua’s parents are William and Ruth Barns of Richland Township, Grant County, Indiana. If so my ggg grandfather Aaron Hill Barnes is his brother and he too was in the Civil War in 1861. Would like to hear from you one way or the other.
      Thanks,
      Terri

      Reply
      1. Dave Harbert

        Hi,
        Sorry for the delayed response but i had forgotten about my post on June 11th and failed to check this site up until now. Joshua Barnes was from an area called Spice valley i believe. I think thats in Lawrence(?) county.His parents were…Eli and Hannah. Eli owned a distillery in Spice Valley around 1850. Eli’s father was also named Joshua and was born in N.C.
        Hope this helps and sorry it took so long.
        Dave

    2. Barry Holsapple

      Hi Dave
      I would love to have a copy of pic. of your great grandfather if you dont mind. I am currently looking for a pic. of my great great grandfather who was also in the 10th ind. cav. co.I his name was Eli N. Holsapple.so interesting,same company! Thanks ,Barry Holsapple

      Reply
  11. Larry R. Cox

    My great great grandfather Alfred H. Cox from posey county also served in the Indiana 10th calvary. Any information would be great.

    Reply
  12. Joan Gonzales

    My great great grandfather William Taylor Ballard and his brother Samuel A Ballard were in Co L 10th Regiment of Indiana Cav 125th. William was captured at Hollow Tree Gap TN Dec 17, 1863, prioner of war at Andersonville, paroled April 28, 1865 at Jacksonville FL, mustered out at Camp Chase Ohio, May 18, 1865.

    Reply
  13. Gregory A. Land

    My great grandfather was Alexander B. Land. He was in co. H of the 10th Indiana cavalry. He was in a train accident in May of 1864 near Gallatin Tennessee and hurt his back. He spent alot of his time in military hospitals it appears. Was with the unit at Decatur Alabama and was dischared in August 1865 in Vicksburg Miss. He died in May of 1924 and is buried in Mount Jackson Cemetery in Indianapolis.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      My great x3 father was also in co. H. of the 10th Ind. cav. I think he was captured at paint rock Ala. December 1963. His name William B. Smith from Jefferson county. Later released from prison camp was killed on Sultana explosion. On his daughters 1st. B day.

      Reply
  14. Joan Gonzales

    Correction to my previous information. William Taylor Ballard was captured at Hollow Tree Gap or Holly Tree Gap, TN on Dec 17, 1864, must have been released because records show he captured again Dec 17, 1864 at Franklin, TN.

    Reply
  15. Mike B

    My great great great grandfather, Lemuel Wood Bacon was a Private in Company A of the 125th Regiment of the 10th Cavalry. He was from Posey County, Indiana when he enlisted. If anyone has any information or possibly a photo of him or the regiment I would love to get a copy and talk to you about it. I can be emailed at michaelcbacon@yahoo.com Thank you.

    Reply
      1. Lori Bright

        Thank you…your posting from the Civil War cite was sent to me (I think all members received postings) and then I logged onto the Civil War cite to get more information.  

        I thought it was great to find someone who had a relative in the same regiment as my GGGGG grandfather and hopefully by making connections with people, someone, somewhere will have a photograph of our ancestors or the regiment.

        My Elvis Fraim died in 1911, so one would think there is some sort of photograph of him, but I have had no luck.  It would be great if he had one of him in his uniform, but again, no luck.

        Thanks,

        Lori

      2. Anonymous

        I have some of my ancestor but not in uniform. I was told that his youngest daughter had thrown his old uniform out thinking no one would ever want it? Very sad.

      3. Anonymous

        Hello, I just received an email notice today (October 23, 2014) of your comment from July. Yes, that is so very sad that she threw the uniform out. By any chance would you have any photograph of him, Elvis Fraim, even if it’s out of uniform? Thank you so much.

      4. Lori

        Hello,

        I replied to your comment, but I may have done something wrong, so here it goes again. I just received an email notice today (10-23-14) of you July comment.

        That is so, so sad that the youngest daughter threw out his uniform. I often wondered what happened to it. Thank you for telling me.

        Would you have a photograph(s) of Elvis Fraim?

        Thank you so much – I appreciate your time and help.

        Lori

      5. Gregory A. Land

        I’m sorry you mis-understood what I wrote. I was simply talking about my ancestor from the 10th Indiana Calvary, not Elvis Fraim. My ancestor was Alexander Land. Sorry for the mistake.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s