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$150,000 for the Battlefield
A Fundraising Event for Battlefield Preservation
October 16, 2014

On a single night in mid-October, The Battle of Franklin Trust will attempt to secure $150,000 toward the purchase of the Lovell property, which is adjacent to The Carter House.

Once part of the Carter family garden, the Lovell property was caught in the midst of the some of the most furious fighting during the Battle of Franklin. It is currently home to the Flower Shop and Williamson County CASA, both of which will relocate elsewhere in Franklin after the purchase. On May 27, The Battle of Franklin Trust and Franklin’s Charge jointly entered into a contract and agreed to raise $2.8 million in one year to complete the purchase of the property. Encompassing 1.6 acres, the land will become part of the 20-acre Carter’s Hill Battlefield Park.

Local developer Calvin Lehew recently committed to lead the fundraising charge with a $50,000 donation. At least five other donors have contributed amounts of at least $5,000 each and the Trust aims to raise the remaining $75,000 on or before Oct. 16.

This signature kickoff event will be held at The Carter House on Thursday, Oct.16 from 4 to 7 p.m. Funds raised will be allocated entirely toward the Lovell property project. The property is perhaps the most important piece of Civil War battlefield in American that has yet to be preserved. It is also a crucial component of the Carter’s Hill Park that is emerging along Columbia Pike.

During the $150,000 For The Battlefield event, donation and pledge tables will be set up around the historic site for guests to contribute to the cause. To reach its goal, the Trust will need at least 300 individuals or organizations to each make a minimum $250 donation, but any larger contribution is welcome. Pledges may be made as long as they are fulfilled by May 31, 2015.

“This one of a kind event is an opportunity for the local community to engage in battlefield preservation and make a profound impact,” said Battle of Franklin Trust CEO Eric A. Jacobson. “Saving this property is a legacy that future generations, both here in Franklin and across the country, will appreciate for generations to come.”

The Carter House is located at 1140 Columbia Ave, Franklin, TN 37064. Catering will be provided by Copper Kettle and drinks will be provided by Red Dog Wine & Spirits. Three John Paul Strain historic art prints, all depicting events at Spring Hill and Franklin, will be auctioned during the event, and all donors will receive a free Battle of Franklin Trust annual membership as well as an “I Helped Save the Battlefield” t-shirt. For more information, please call Laurie McPeak at 615-794-0903.

http://battleoffranklintrust.org/battlefield_preservation.htm

From the Tennessean (read)

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This article was just posted to The Tennessean online.

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The amazing thing to me is how far-reaching the visitors are to my Battle of Franklin blog.  Just since 2012 (the blog was started in 2006), there have been nearly 450,000 total views representing visitors from more than 141 countries. Here are the top fifteen visitors by country according to WordPress.

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I started blogging on the Battle of Franklin in 2006. There are almost 1,000 unique posts here and we will soon see our 450,000th view!  I launched the BoF Facebook site in October 2009.  That group has grown to over 4,500 friends.  It may be the largest single battle-focsued Facebook site in existence, at least as best I can tell.

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I sincerely appreciate all the hundreds of daily visitors my blog and Facebook site receives.  I do it for the pure love of the subject matter.  I’ve never cared to turn these properties into a money-making model.

Here are the top posts of all time according to WordPress.

From history to mystery – 4,957 views

John and Carrie McGavock describe the scene after the Battle of Franklin – 3,842 views

CSA Order of the Battle of Franklin – 3,830 views

Franklin maps – 3,624 views

“101 stuff” – 2,805 views

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Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

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Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

Make sure to check-out the Google Map of the Franklin Civil War Guide.
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