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Charles D. Hammer joined the 124th Ohio Vol. Infantry in 1862 and during his service came to Franklin in 1863 and was at the Battle of Franklin and Nashville. He returned to visit Franklin friends three times after the war.

Hammer 124th OH

Image courtesy of Historic Foundation of Williamson County

Hammer was 18 years old when he enlisted as a sergeant on 8/4/1862. On 2/28/1864 he mustered into “A” Co. OH 124th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 6/9/1865

Promotions:
* Private 11/15/1862 (Reduced to ranks)
* 1st Lieut 5/23/1863 (1st Lieut & Adjutant)
* Capt 1/18/1865 (Declined promotion)
* 1st Lieut 2/26/1865 (As of Co. G)

Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 5/23/1863 from company A to Field & Staff
* 2/26/1865 from Field & Staff to company G

Other Information:
born in Baltimore, MD
Member of GAR Post # 36 (Francis Gould) in Arlington, MA
died 5/3/1932

Isaac R. Sherwood was a resident of Williams County OH when he enlisted as a 26 year-old Newspaper Editor into into “C” Co. OH 14th Infantry in April 1861.

Sherwood 111thOHio

 

Image courtesy of Historic Foundation of Williamson County

Enlisted on 4/22/1861 as a Private.

On 4/27/1861 he mustered into “C” Co. OH 14th Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 8/15/1861

On 8/20/1862 he mustered into Field & Staff OH 111th Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 6/27/1865 at Salisbury, NC

sherwood 111th OHPromotions:
* 1st Lieut 9/6/1862 (1st Lieut & Adjutant)
* Major 2/1/1863
* Lt Colonel 1/1/1864
* Colonel 9/8/1864
* Brig-General 2/27/1865

Other Information:
born 8/13/1835 in Stanford, Dutchess Co., NY
died 10/15/1925 in Toledo, OH

“The Battle of Franklin, fought Nov.30, 1864, was the most destructive of human life in proportion to the number engaged of any battle in the four years war… at midnight on the battlefield of Franklin, the finger of destiny was lifted pointing the open road to Appomattox.” (Gen. Isaac Sherwood; 111th Ohio Infantry)

Nashville, Tenn
Dec 3rd, 1864

There is a mail going out in a few minutes and I must write a few lines to tell you of my safety. You have heard of the fight at Franklin day before yesterday and will be anxious to hear particulars.

I was sent with several others of the Co. after rations about an hour before the charge was made and the fight was almost over before we could get to our works. Tho we started immediately, I tell you, it was a hard battle but our boys stood their ground like heroes, tho a part of the 4th Corps left their works which almost lost the day for us. Our Corps has now, at last, a name which we may be proud of. The enemy’s loss was awful, you can have no idea of it unless you could see the field. The nearest fighting in our Brigade line was directly in front of our Co. We were the left center Co., next to the Colors, and they seemed determined to capture them, but our boys stuck to them. The rebels came up on to our works, some of them jumping clear over them. The ditch in front was piled with dead and wounded and for rods in front, a man could hardly put his foot down without stepping on them. Our loss was comparatively slight, 5 wounded in our Co . . . .

We don’t fear the enemy here. We are well fixed.

Source: (p. 125)

“Burning Rails as We Pleased”: The Civil War Letters of of William Garrigues Bentley, 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. McFarland, 2011.

These items are listed for sale in the December 8th, 2012 Heritage Auction.  They belonged to Capt. William F. Kemble, Co. C, 104th Ohio Vol. Infantry.

The auction description says:

 “…breasting the storm of deadly musketry, bursting shell and flying shot…” With his dying breaths he instructed his comrades to be certain to send his sword home to his family. Here is Captain Kemble’s sword and belt, accompanied by a poignant letter from a fellow officer who was by Kemble’s side when he died. The sword is a fine imported non-regulation officer’s sword with rayskin grips and steel hilt bearing a spread-winged eagle over “U. S.” The blade is profusely etched with floral designs, trophies and a large “U.S.” and is in near perfect condition with much luster. The steel scabbard has a smooth, even patina. The sword belt features a heavy M. 1851 officer’s sword belt plate in high relief. The belt itself is sound but the suspensory straps have broken and are detached. Perhaps the most outstanding part of this grouping is the touching letter sent to Kemble’s wife by fellow officer Robert C. Taggart who witnessed Kemble’s mortal wounding and was with him at his death. The letter offers a description of how he was shot and, most importantly that as Taggart was “bending over my expiring friend…the only words he could utter were send my sword to my family and tell them my last thoughts were with them.” The four-page letter continues to mention sending the sword to Mrs. Kemble and inform her that her husband was buried with other members of his regiment “on the north bank of Big Harpeth Creek,” lauding him in the flowery language of Victorian America. One of the most touching groupings Heritage Auctions has ever offered and a sword with exquisite provenance.
Estimate: $8,000 – up.

This soldier, Eli Bachman Co E 71st Ohio Volunteers, was part of Wood’s Division which was not engaged at Franklin, however, Bachman saw action at Spring Hill and Nashville.

This CDV is for sale through Heritage Auction for December 2012.

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Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

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Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

Make sure to check-out the Google Map of the Franklin Civil War Guide.
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