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Sixth Plate Ambrotype of Confederate Color-Bearer Ensign John J. Cherry, 3rd Mis

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Auction partial listing: died of wounds received at Franklin. An early likeness of John Cherry at about 18 years of age likely taken at the time of his enlistment in Company C., 3rd Mississippi Infantry in September 1861, identified by old folded slip of paper in case having penciled “J.J. Cherry.” 

The 3rd Miss was part of Loring’s Division, Featherston’s Brigade. Jacobson says that Cherry was shot in the upper right arm and died of his wounds in January 1865.

Source: Cowan’s auction, 2006

Historian Timothy L. Burgess has recently published a significant work on Confederate deaths burials in Nashville. Perhaps no one knows this subject better than Mr. Burgess, who has been researching the subject for nearly four decades.

Burgess book cover

 

To order the book:

$22.00 with postage
Send check or MO to:
Tim Burgess
128 Maple Dr.
Hendersonville, TN 37075

This letter was auctioned off in 2013 and provides some interesting detail about rebel activity after the Battle of Franklin as well as casualty numbers for the 64th Ohio Infantry.

Private Frank Ashley

Co. H, 64th Ohio Volunteers

Camp Near Nashville Tenn

December 8 – 64

“…it is reported the railroad is cut between here and Louisville…it is also reported that the (rebels) are falling back in the direction of Franklin Tenn But they are visible in our front also hear cannonading up the river…I have not heard of W T Sherman for some time but he is alright with out doubt The non veterans of our Regt will be mustered out soon which will make it Small having a heavy loss in the late Battle of Franklin our loss is 121 men killed wounded and missing…”

letter

Here are the most searched-for Infantry units on the blog according to the blog visitors. Not surprisingly, Confederate units are of the highest interests by my visitors.

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14th tennessee as version 81311

Issued to the 14th Tennessee Infantry in the summer of 1862, this flag was carried into the works during Pickett’s Charge by Tennesseans from Robertson, Montgomery, and Stewart counties. Held at the U.S. War Department for decades, about 500 captured Confederate battle flags were returned to the former Confederate and border states in 1905. This Richmond Depot flag of the 14th Tennessee Infantry was one of those, and it currently resides at the Tennessee State Museum.

The folks at the State Museum have shown extreme care with this flag – all our flags, actually – over the years. This particular flag exhibits signs of a partial and earlier conservation treatment. But today we find the flag of the 14thTennessee listed by museum staff as among those most in need of conservation. General Robert E. Lee watched this flag advance across the field at Gettysburg, hoisted by men who might never return. Today, 150 years after the beginning of one of America’s defining moments, we implore you to contribute to preserving this piece of cloth – this piece of history. See details on how you can help at http://saveourflags.org/index.php/donate

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Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

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Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

Make sure to check-out the Google Map of the Franklin Civil War Guide.
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