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Upon learning the entire Federal army had escaped Spring Hill during the night of the 29th, C.S.A. Gen John Bell Hood spoke these words on the morning of the 30th, “the best move of my career as a soldier come to naught.”


Last night passed off quietly. At 8 we are packed ready to move. The forces behind us have just moved out. The enemy have been trying all morning to get possession of the ford, consequently several artillery fights as well as skirmishes today with musketry in fact has been a noisy war-like day. Eve: The enemy just before dusk charged and drove our skirmishers away from the ford but they held on to part of their line. The operation made a great rattling of musketry and supposing the enemy to be attacking in force our Regt was ordered double quick up to the scene of action. The artillery thundered away for a while, and with darkness relapsed into silence. In our movement our Regt was very much exposed to the raking fire through its whole length yet the Rebs did not take advantage of it. Soon after dark we withdrew in silence and was on the march back to Franklin a distance of 23 miles. Just before we got to Spring Hill we could see a long string of lights on our right not far off, and supposing it was the 4th Corps in camp we were looking forward to an immediate rest when to our surprise we were told that it was the lights of a rebble camp. Men ordered not to speak nor let their accoutrements rattle, we were so close we could see their camp guards (night guards).

Written by Addison Lee Ewing, Captain, Co F, 63rd Indiana Infantry
(Previous posts related to Ewing)

Source: Ewing Mss. Manuscripts department, The Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

Ken Burns, known for his famous PBS historical series, said the “only thing better than Sam Watkins (author of Company Aytch) is more Sam Watkins.”  The Franklin Civil War Round Table is proud to present Ruth Hill McAllister, Mr. Watkin’s great granddaughter, at our June 10th session.  Ms McAllister, after having found a copy of Sam’s original version of his famous account during his time with the Army of Tennessee, produced in 2007 a new edition incorporating some of her grandfather’s handwritten notes.

The story of Mr. Watkins will be told in only a way that a dedicated descendant can present.  For those of you who have heard Ms McAllister in the past, she will fascinate you will little known details about life in Middle Tennessee, Columbia and the Army of Tennessee during the War.  She was recently a featured speaker on the 150th anniversary of The Battle of Shiloh PBS special presentation.

Please mark your calendars to be at the Franklin Police Community Room for this special event, 3 PM, June 10th.

By Thomas Cartwright and Michael Holloway.

Robert Hicks, author of New York Times bestseller The Widow of the South said, “Thomas Cartwright has partnered up with Michael Holloway to give us Sam Watkins Co. Aytch and what a gift it is.  For those of us who have loved ol’ Sam and his Co. Aytch, this is long overdue.  For those who have never read Co. Aytch, it is the best introduction I can think of.” 

Hicks added, “In Sam’s own words, Cartwright movingly retells the story of Sam’s adventures in the service of the South.  It is hard to imagine anyone that Sam would have rather had retell his story.  Added to all of this is the wonderful music that Michael Holloway wrote and performed in accompaniment to Sam’s words.

Cartwright and Holloway have hit this one out of the park.  This CD is a must for anyone who loves the rich history of the American Civil War.” DVD is $24.00 plus shipping and sales tax (for Tennessee residents) .

Order online.

 

All of the original bricks used in the construction of St. John’s Episcopal Church from 1839-1842 were cast on site by workers. Here are some pictures of the exterior of St. John’s that show the handiwork of the brickmasons. The church was designed in the Gothic style.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

St. John’s Episcopal Church, in Columbia, was built as a plantation church BY the Polk family, and FOR the Polk family. All of the wood was provided from trees on the property. Here is a sampling of what one can find inside the church.

 

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Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

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Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

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