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The Battle of Franklin Trust is proud to host our annual Blue and Gray Days event presented by SunTrust Bank.

This year’s event will begin on Friday November 2 and run through Saturday November 3. Friday morning from 8:00am-12:30pm will be reserved specifically for school groups and will open to the general public at 12:30.

Guided house tours will be available on Friday afternoon at both the Carter House and Carnton Plantation, and will end with our last tour at 4:00pm.

Saturday both homes will open at 8:00am and will close at 5:00pm. The last guided house tour will be at 4:00pm. Blue and Gray Day events will end at 2:00 pm on Saturday.

Each site will feature a variety of living historians that visitors can talk to and learn more about life during the Civil War era. Visitors can meet with Dennis Boggs as Abraham Lincoln, learn about Civil War photography, and interact with a surgeon, a flag demonstrator, and a blacksmith, in addition to re-enactors.

Grounds Fee $5

House Tours: 
Adults: $15
Seniors $12
Children (6-12): $8
Children Under 6: Free

Please contact Megan at
615.794.0903 ormegan@battleoffranklintrust.orgwith any questions.

One of my highlights every year is to attend the annual McGavock Confederate Cemetery Memorial Service, hosted by the United Daughter’s of the Confederacy, Franklin Chapter #14,  at Carnton.  Boy Scout Troop #137 will install a Confederate flag next to each of the 1,500 markers in the cemetery. The Boy Scouts have been doing this for 30+ years according to John Green, Commander.

The event kicks off at 2pm, rain or shine. There is always a guest speaker, Confederate re-enactors, and a babgpipe presentation.

Here is a link to last year’s service with a photo gallery.

“Hoofbeats in the Heartland: Civil War Cavalry in Tennessee”  – a traveling exhibit with the Tennessee State Museum, will be coming to Carnton Plantation in mid November. The web site says:

Presented by the Tennessee State Museum and the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area, this traveling exhibit will be at Carnton in November and December of 2011. Tracing mounted warfare throughout Tennessee from 1861 to 1865, this exhibit explores the impact of war on the small communities as well as the large cities. Topics covered include military occupation, spies, guerillas, and highlights on major battles.

Funded in part by a grant from the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area, the traveling exhibition opened at Travellers Rest Historic House Museum in June of 2007 and continues to travel across Tennessee through the early part of 2010.

Drawing upon artifacts, photographs, drawings, and art from the collection of the Museum, the exhibition explores seven thematic areas: (1) Leaders (commanders such as Nathan Bedford Forrest, John Hunt Morgan, Samuel Carter, and John Wilder), (2) Troopers, (3) Horses and Mules, (4) Occupation and the home front, (5) Spies, Scouts, Partisans and Guerillas, (6) Battles in Tennessee, and (7) the Legacy. Each section includes photos, graphics, and artifacts explaining the role of mounted warfare during the Civil War era.

Due to mounted warfare, the home front often became the battle field as mounted soldiers skirmished on the streets of Memphis, Murfreesboro, Greeneville, and hundreds of towns and communities across the state. Indeed, every county of the state felt the impact of Union and Confederate cavalry thundering across the state as part of a raiding party, occupation force, or guerilla band. Each community had its unique experience with Civil War cavalry forces and the State Museum has encouraged each venue hosting the exhibition to develop a local history component to compliment the traveling exhibition.

For more information contact Myers Brown, Curator of Extension Services, at 615-741-2692 or by email at Myers.Brown@state.tn.us

The United Daughter’s of the Confederacy, Franklin Chapter #14, hosted the annual Memorial service today at Carnton. It was a blazing 94 degrees when Boy Scout Troop #137 arrived to install a Confederate flag next to each of the 1,500 markers in the cemetery. The Boy Scouts have been doing this for 30+ years according to John Green, Commander.

Just as the service began the wind whipped up furiously.

Here are a few sample pics of today’s service and here is the link to all 43 photos taken of the event.

Video from today’s event will be coming soon, check back.

Mississippi section at McGavock

Ronnie Mancrum

Boy Scout Troop #137 Commander John Green receives a plaque.

U P D A T E : 9:45 CST, Sunday, April 17th

Robert Hicks just posted on his Facebook page the following regarding the running of the CBS segment:

was informed yesterday that the story ran quite long & they simply didn’t have time in this week’s broadcast to accommodate it. Rather than make draconian cuts, they decided to wait until next Sunday (Easter Sunday) to air the piece. Stay tuned; we still have 4 years, minus this past week, to commemorate the American Civil War.

According to the Battle of Franklin Trust:

CBS Sunday Morning Segment Featuring Robert Hicks and Battle of Franklin Trust Sites

Robert Hicks, far right

Robert Hicks, the author of The Widow of the South and A Separate Country, will be featured on a CBS Sunday Morning segment about Why the Civil War Matters to Southerners. The segment is scheduled to air Sunday morning, April 17. Please check your local listings for the exact air time.

The segment was filmed in Charleston and other locations around the South with a full day of filming in Franklin at Carnton Plantation and The Carter House. The crew also shot some footage at the Domino’s Pizza site, which is now being purchased for battlefield reclamation.

This is the third time Robert Hicks has been featured on CBS Sunday Morning. He was featured first in September of 2005, soon after the release of The Widow of the South. Several years later, Hicks reappeared on the show after he joined a team of authors to fight to save the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut from closing.

In the field of historic preservation, Hicks has served on the Boards of Historic Carnton Plantation, the Battle of Franklin Trust, the Tennessee State Museum, The Williamson County Historical Society, and the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts. Hicks is founding chairman emeritus of Franklin’s Charge: A Campaign for the Reclamation and Preservation of Franklin’s Historic Battlefield. Jim Lighthizer, president of the Civil War Trust, said “There is no close second in any community in the nation to match the success of Franklin’s Charge in preserving and reclaiming the battlefield at Franklin.”

Please support Robert Hicks and The Battle of Franklin Trust by tuning in to CBS Sunday Morning on April 17.

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Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

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Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

Make sure to check-out the Google Map of the Franklin Civil War Guide.
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