You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Booknote’ category.

Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 4.58.49 PMA lot of us have been waiting for Eric Jacobson’s book to be published in Kindle format. Here it is.

For Cause & For Country offers a balanced and richly detailed study of the battles that helped to decide the outcome of the Civil War. Students of Spring Hill and Franklin will appreciate the abundance of new information which will show that the battles had a far greater scope and importance than many previously realized. Those not familiar with the story will find themselves drawn to the incredible events of late 1864, when Middle Tennessee stood center stage as the divided nation defined and repaired itself through blood and fire. – Book description

Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 5.02.23 PMTo be published in August 2014, Amazon says: Scholars hail the find as “the most important discovery in Civil War scholarship in the last half century.” The invaluable cache of Confederate General John Bell Hood’s personal papers includes wartime and postwar letters from comrades, subordinates, former enemies and friends, exhaustive medical reports relating to Hood’s two major wounds, and dozens of touching letters exchanged between Hood and his wife, Anna. This treasure trove of information is being made available for the first time for both professional and amateur Civil War historians in Stephen “Sam” Hood’s The Lost Papers of Confederate General John Bell Hood.

Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 5.07.32 PMAmazon says (partially): Twenty-five Hours to Tragedy: The Battle of Spring Hill and Operations on November 29, 1864 – Precursor to the Battle of Franklin is a compilation of eyewitness testimony linked by narrative telling the story of the great missed opportunity by the Confederate Army of Tennessee on November 29, 1864. Led by General John Bell Hood, a Confederate envelopment around Columbia, Tennessee left Union Major General John McAllister Schofield’s Fourth and Twenty-third Army corps strung out and beyond supporting distance of their wagon train. One lone division that had been sent to Spring Hill to protect the Union Army’s wagon train found itself confronting nearly 25,000 Confederate soldiers by mid-afternoon. While Union Major General David S. Stanley did all in his power to stop the Confederate attack, it seemed nothing could save them. Suddenly the fog of war set in, and as the sun sank on the western horizon, the Confederate high command found itself paralyzed with inaction, indecision, poor judgment and finally darkness.

 

Jacob Dolson Cox, The March to the Sea, Chapter Five: Battle of Franklin (Download in PDF)

The Battle of Franklin Tennessee November 30, 1864, by Jacob D. Cox, 1897 (Entire book in PDF)

Jacob Dolson Cox, (Jr.) (October 27, 1828 – August 4, 1900) was a lawyer, a Union Army general during the American Civil War, and later a Republican politician from Ohio. He served as the 28th Governor of Ohio and as United States Secretary of the Interior. (Wikipedia)

The newly released “The Library of Congress Illustrated Timeline of the Civil War” by Little-Brown is instantly the best resource of its kind on the market, and well it should be. The senior writer and editor in the Publishing Office has led an effort to produce a first-rate reference book.  Every public library should have this book and even the casual Civil War enthusiast will thoroughly enjoy perusing its pages.

It’s a typical over-sized reference book ( 13 x 9 3.4), but thin enough – with just 240 pages – to stand alongside one’s existing Civil War atlases.  The layout is consistent, pleasing, and chalked full of interesting quotes and with more than 350 color illustrations.

The illustrations are not just eye-candy for the reader either, although many of the images used in the book are very rare. A few I have to admit I’ve never seen before.  One will find

manuscripts in Lincoln’s own hand, onsite drawings made by a Civil War combat artist, maps, color lithographs, political cartoons, posters, [and] period photographs.

Margaret E. Wagner is no stranger to Civil War reference books either. She is the co-author and co-editor of “The Library of Congress Civil War Desk Reference” and “The Library of Congress World War II Companion.” She is also the author of “The American Civil War: 365 Days,” “World War II: 365 Days,” and “Maxfield Parrish and the Illustrators of the Golden Age.”

Most pages are divided into two parts. The top half (about 40% of the page layout) contains the artfully chosen illustrations to supplement the text. My favorites are images of actual hand-drawn pictures from the period.  The bottom 60% of the page contains the text based on a pertinent event for a given day of the month/year.

I was delighted to even find an entry for May 12-13th, 1862, for the escape of The Planterby Robert Smalls and his clandestine crew. The inclusion of this event shows the editor and her staff are well-informed as to an event that is normally overlooked by most resources of its kind.

The fine book retails for just $35.00 but can be purchased from Amazon for a mere $22.00 or so.

What’s happening related to the 150th anniversary of the BoF?

Join our 4,500+ member Facebook group.

Browse previous posts

Archives

Bloghistorian

Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

The Battle of Franklin blog


New books for the Sesquicentennial

The 58th Indiana at Stone's River

Who Built Fort Granger?

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 216 other followers

Learn about McGavock Confederate Cemetery

Blog Stats

  • 450,673 hits

Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

Make sure to check-out the Google Map of the Franklin Civil War Guide.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 216 other followers