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Ken Burns, known for his famous PBS historical series, said the “only thing better than Sam Watkins (author of Company Aytch) is more Sam Watkins.”  The Franklin Civil War Round Table is proud to present Ruth Hill McAllister, Mr. Watkin’s great granddaughter, at our June 10th session.  Ms McAllister, after having found a copy of Sam’s original version of his famous account during his time with the Army of Tennessee, produced in 2007 a new edition incorporating some of her grandfather’s handwritten notes.

The story of Mr. Watkins will be told in only a way that a dedicated descendant can present.  For those of you who have heard Ms McAllister in the past, she will fascinate you will little known details about life in Middle Tennessee, Columbia and the Army of Tennessee during the War.  She was recently a featured speaker on the 150th anniversary of The Battle of Shiloh PBS special presentation.

Please mark your calendars to be at the Franklin Police Community Room for this special event, 3 PM, June 10th.

The Army of Tennessee pattern battle flag adorns this rare belt plate worn by John Bell Hood. His French manufactured cavalry officer’s saber is an interesting choice for an infantry officer.

Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond

Here’s a list of Confederate Generals who were engaged at the Battle of Franklin, Nov 30, 1864.

John Adams
William B. Bate
William F. Brantley
John C. Brown
Abraham Buford
John C. Carter
James R. Chalmers
Patrick R. Cleburne
Francis Marion Cockrell
Zachariah Deas
Winfield Scott Featherston
Samuel G. French
States Rights Gist
George W. Gordon
Edward Johnson
Mark P. Lowrey
Hiram B. Granbury
S. D. Lee
John Bell Hood
Nathan Bedford Forrest
Henry Jackson
William Hicks Jackson
S. D. Lee
W. W. Loring
Mark P. Lowrey
Arthur C. Manigault
William Quarles
Daniel Reynolds
Thomas M. Scott
Claudius W. Sears
Jacob Sharp
Charles Shelley
Thomas Benton Smith
A. P. Stewart
Otho F. Strahl
Edward C. Walthall

This CDV was recently sold at auction by HA. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture states:

During the Civil War, Quintard was a chaplain for the Confederate army. He also worked as a surgeon. As bishop he was instrumental in the revival of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Tennessee and extended its ministry to blacks.

This Sixth Plate Ruby Ambrotype is of Pvt. Thomas H. Chandlier, 48th Tennessee Infantry (CSA). It was recently sold at auction by HA. Chandlier’s unit missed the action at Franklin but he was captured at Nashville on December 15th, 1864.

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Kraig McNutt is the author and publisher of this blog. He has been blogging on Franklin for over five years and on the Civil War in general since 1995. Email him.

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Summary of the Battle of Franklin

The Battle of Franklin was fought on November 30, 1864 in Franklin, Tennessee; in Williamson County. John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee (around 33,000 men) faced off with John M. Schofield's Army of the Ohio and the Cumberland (around 30,000 men). Often cited as "the bloodiest five hours" during the American Civil War, the Confederates lost between 6,500 - 7,500 men, with 1,750 dead. The Federals lost around 2,000 - 2,500 men, with just 250 or less killed. Hood lost 30,000 men in just six months (from July 1864 until December 15). The Battle of Franklin was fought mostly at night. Several Confederate Generals were killed, including Patrick Cleburne, and the Rebels also lost 50% of their field commanders. Hood would limp into Nashville two weeks later before suffering his final defeat before retreating to Pulaski in mid December. Hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers were taken to the John and Carrie McGavock home - Carnton - after the battle. She became known as the Widow of the South. The McGavock's eventually donated two acres to inter the Confederate dead. Almost 1,500 Rebel soldiers are buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, just in view of the Carnton house.

Make sure to check-out the Google Map of the Franklin Civil War Guide.
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