Letter from Pvt James A. McCord of Co G, 30th Georgia Infantry to his brother Capt William McCord who commanded Company G until wounded at Jonesboro, Georgia August 31, 1864. Capt McCord was recuperating at his home in Jackson, Georgia when this letter was written. (From Special Collections of the Woodruff Library of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia)

Franklin Tenn
Decr. 3rd 1864
Dear Brother

After a long and very hard march, we arrived at this place, the 30th day of Novr. about 4 oclk when we went immediately into a fight and every one says that it was the hardest fought battle that has been fought during the war. There is no telling what our loss is. We lost ten Genls killed & wounded. Genls Cleburne Granburry, Gist, Adams, Strahl, & one more I forgotten were killed and four that were wounded. Granbury’s celebrated brigade left this place yesterday morning with 137 Guns all told. Hall & Jno Tom Gillispie(1) was both killed dead on the field, and nearly every one of the company fared the same fate. The larger portion of Genl Bates Div acted very cowardly in the first of the fight. Tyler’s & Finley’s and Jackson’s left would not charge the works.

I was skirmishing in front of Tyler & Finley and they run three times and left me on the hill begging them to come back when one of old Abes boys plugged me in the right foot, making it a severe wound, tho not a serious one I hope. I am well cared for. I do not know any place where I could fare as I do here. The people are the kindest in the world especially the Ladies. The world does not know their superior and I doubt that their equal can be found.

Lt McKibbin(2) wounded in left fore arm. Troy Saunders(3) slightly in arm (gone back to Co.) Mo Mays(4) & Ben Deason(5) were wounded but not dangerous I believe. I do not know how your company suffered (but little I believe). No Country knows a braver man than Genl Bates. I am proud to say that there was no one between me and the Yankees when I was wounded. You will have to excuse this short letter as my foot pains me a great deal & I do not know when I will get a chance to send off though I believe I will put it in the P.O. Give my love to all.
Truly yours
Jas A McCord(6)

P.S. This fight lasted eleven hours.

Notes:

(1) Cpl William Hall Gillespie, Co B, 7th Texas Infantry was mortally wounded and died at Franklin, Tennessee. He is buried in McGavock Confederate Cemetery, Texas Section 3, Grave 39. His brother, Pvt John Thomas Gillespie Jr. was in the same company and was also killed at Franklin. He is buried in Texas Section 2, Grave 26.

(2) Lt Martin Van Buren McKibben enlisted as 5th Sgt, Co I, 30th Georgia Infantry on September 25, 1861. He was appointed 1st Sgt May 13, 1862. Promoted to Jr 2nd Lt on July 16, 1863 and 2nd Lt in 1864. He was severely wounded at Franklin on November 30, 1864. He was listed in Saint Mary’s Hospital at West Point, Mississippi on January 13, 1865.

(3) Pvt Troy S. Saunders enlisted in Co I, 30th Georgia Infantry on June 30, 1863. He was wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia on September 19, 1863. He was listed in Direction Hospital at Griffin, Georgia on December 22, 1863. No further record.

(4) Pvt Robert W. Mays enlisted in Co I, 30th Georgia Infantry on September 25, 1861. Roll for December 31, 1862, last on file, shows him ‘present’. Pension records show he was wounded in the right breast at the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia on September 19, 1863. Born 1842, he died in Butts County, Georgia on December 8, 1918.

(5) Pvt Benjamin T. Deason enlisted in Co I, 30th Georgia Infantry on September 25, 1861. He was wounded at the Battle of Franklin and captured in one of the Confederate hospitals there on December 17, 1864. He was released from Camp Chase, Ohio Prison on June 13, 1865.

(6) Pvt James A. McCord enlisted on November 1, 1862. In January 1864, he was on detail duty as a clerk at the General Hospital in Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi due to a disability. He was wounded at the Battle of Franklin and captured in one of the Confederate hospitals there on December 17, 1864. He was released from Camp Chase, Ohio Prison in June, 1865.

Content taken from Save the Franklin Battlefield web site

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